Betekintés: Euroexam practice test, C1

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Euro C1 Practice Test A complete set of the C1 Level Euro Exam papers with instructions, answer key and audio CD Euro Examinations Practice Test • Level C1 • Operational Proficiency CONTENTS ExamGuide Page 2 Test 1 Reading & Writing Part A • Question Paper • Answer Sheet Page 5 Page 12 Reading & Writing Part B • Question Paper • Answer Sheet Page 13 Page 18 Answer Keys Test 1: Reading & Writing • The Answer Key • Marking schemes Page 46 Page 46 Test 2: Listening • The Answer Key • The Tapescript Page 49 Page 50 Test 3: Grammar and Vocabulary • The Answer Key Page 56 Test 2 Listening • Question Paper • Answer Sheet Page 19 Page 23 Test 3 Grammar and Vocabulary • Question Paper • Answer Sheet Page 25 Page 30 Test 4 Mediation Part A • Question and Answer Sheet Mediation Part B • Question Paper • Answer Sheet Page 54 Page 35 Test5 Speaking Page 37 Test 4: Mediation • The Answer Key • The Tapescript for Part A •

Marking Criteria for Part B Page 59 Page 60 Page 64 Page 33 Copyright 2006 Euro Examination Centre. All rights reserved. No parts of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of the Euro Examination Ltd. Jelen kiadvány teljes egészében szerzői mű, az Euro Nyelvvizsga Kft. szellemi tulajdona. Bárminemű sokszorosítás vagy további felhasználás kizárólag az Euro Nyelvvizsga Kft. kifejezett írásos hozzájárulásával engedélyezett! Exam Guide Page 2 Exam Guide Level C1 The Euro and EuroPro exams test communicative competence by testing success in real communication. Exam tasks are directly based on the Common European Framework of the Council of Europe. Passing the Euro or the EuroPro Exam indicates that the candidate can undertake a variety of real-life tasks in English. Below is a table showing for each test its name, the number of tasks, the time allowed and the number

of available marks. Each of the tests is then described on the following pages. In order to pass the candidate must get 65% of the 150 available marks, as well as getting 40% or more in each test. Test number Test Number of tasks Time Marks Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 Test 5 Reading & Writing Listening Grammar & Vocabulary Mediation Speaking 5 3 3 3 4 60+45 45 40 20+30 10+20 50 25 25 25 25 Approx. 4 hrs 30 + breaks 150 Total time / Marks available Test 1- Reading & Writing Part A (Time: 60 minutes) or an advert. The task is to write a 120-150 word letter with a specific transactional purpose as described in the rubric, referring to the short texts. Task 1 - Paragraph headings You match seven paragraphs of a text of 400450 words excerpted from newspapers, magazines, advertisements, literature, articles, academic sources, and nine paragraph titles. Test 1- Reading & Writing Part B Task 2 - Long text Task 1 - Multiple-choice reading You read a single

text of 1000-1250 words, normally an article, letter or narrative, and answer questions, writing 150-200 words with specific reference to the text. Answers are marked for content as well as for quality of writing. You read three texts of different genres of 200-300 words each, but all connected to the same theme. After reading each text you answer two multiple choice comprehension questions (six altogether), focusing variously on a specific lexical item, something implied in the text, the writers attitude, the overall meaning of the text or a detailed piece of information. Task 3 - Transactional writing You receive a number of short texts which serve to establish a context for the writing task. These texts will be of various genre, such as a brief announcement, a short letter (Time: 45 minutes) Exam Guide Part B, T a s k 2 - E x t e n s i v e w r i t i n g Candidates are given a choice of three questions, and write 250-300 words within the genre specified. The type of text

could be an article, a report, a non-transactional letter; a descriptive or narrative composition or a discursive essay. Page 3 all the way through with no break, and twice broken down into small units of meaning, with breaks between sections to allow time for writing. T a s k 2 - M u l t i p l e - c h o i c e g a p fill You receive a text of 400-500 words with fifteen gaps where a single word has been removed. For each gap, the task is to choose the appropriate word from among the four given. Test 2 - Listening (Time: 45 minutes) Task 3 - Modified Cloze Task 1 - Short conversations You hear six short pieces, all taking place in the same location, but of several different discourse types. Then you have to select items from two lists (A and B) that correspond to a given text. List A will contain eight items connected to the speakers or the context; List B will contain eight items connected with the spoken text. Task 2 - Making notes You listen to a recorded monologue of about

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three minutes and take notes to be used to answer questions. At three points, there is a pause in the monologue, at which point a question is asked on the tape; you write your answer on the answer sheet. The recording is played only once. You receive a text of 400-500 words with fifteen gaps where a single word has been removed. The task is to write the word that best fills the gap. Test 4 - Mediation Part A (Time: 20 minutes) Task 1 - Dialogue Task 3 - Radio/TV programme You listen to a taped dialogue between two participants, a Hungarian speaking "friend" and an English speaker, probably an official working in some public context. You are the mediator (translator) between the two participants by writing down the translation of each intervention on your Task Sheet. The text is an excerpt from a radio or TV programme, such as news, documentary or formal discussion, of about 3 minutes in length. The task consists of ten multiple choice questions. Test 4 - Mediation Part

B (Time: 30 minutes) T a s k 1 - E n g l i s h into H u n g a r i a n Test 3 - Grammar and Vocabulary (Time: 40 minutes) Task 1 - Dictation You listen to an extended monologue of 150200 words, and try to write the text down word for word. The text is heard three times, once You receive a factual text or a semi-formal letter of 85-100 words, written in English, and have to translate it into Hungarian. Printed dictionaries are allowed to use in this task. P a r t B, T a s k 2 - H u n g a r i a n to E n g l i s h You receive a factual text or a semi-formal letter in Hungarian of 75-90 words, and have to translate it into English. Printed dictionaries are allowed to use in this task. Exam Guide Test 5 - Speaking (Time: 10 minutes preparation + 15 minutes interview) You are examined in pairs with two examiners present, one acting as an interlocutor, the other as an assessor. You get ten minutes beforehand for preparation for Task 2. Printed dictionaries are allowed to use in

this task. Page 4 an opinion, either in support of or against the statement. You are not judged on your opinion and no specific knowledge is required. While candidate A is giving his or her presentation, candidate B takes notes, to use to initiate a short discussion on the content of the presentation. Candidate B is not obliged to agree or disagree, but this would certainly be the most natural and comfortable path to take. It is important that candidate B refers to things that candidate A has said and responds to them rather than referring only to the topic in general. Task 1 - Warm-up You find out more about each other by asking questions and having a short conversation about a topic given by the interlocutor. Some possible topics include travel, work, family, sport, cinema, hobbies, education, relationships, housing, news and current affairs and the environment. Task 2 - Presentation and Discussion You receive a sheet with four statements and prepare a 2-minute presentation or

talk on one of the topics. Before meeting the examiner you get ten minutes to prepare, making notes, which you can use when actually giving the presentation. The statements are focused on topics of general interest and intended to elicit The same procedure is repeated with candidate A responding to candidate Bs presentation. Task 3 - Communicative task You receive a task card with instructions from the interlocutor. Typically, the card has four photographs; the context of the task is that the candidates have been asked to find and choose photographs for the cover of a book on a given theme. The task is to talk about what aspects of the theme each picture illustrates, about what other images they could include, and finally to decide which images would be most appropriate and why. LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY Test 1 Reading & Writing Part A Candidate Number: Time: 60 minutes • Answer all the questions • Write all your answers on this question paper • You

must not speak to the other candidates Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A Task O n e : Headings Page 6 (10 minutes) - Question 1-6 On this page and the next page is an article about the early life of Professor J. C. Wells. Choose the best paragraph heading for each paragraph. The first one has been done for you. A B C D E F G H I SUBSIDISED EDUCATION GIVING UP AN ACADEMIC APPROACH EXAMPLE - FAMILIAL ROOTS A BRIDGE TO WORLD LITERATURE EXPANDING ACADEMIC KNOWLEDGE OF LANGUAGE PARENTS IN FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES IMMERSION LANGUAGE LEARNING PARENTAL OCCUPATIONS NOTING EVERYTHING Professor J. C. Wells Example My father was born in South Africa in 1909. His own father had died shortly after his birth, and my grandmother then brought the family to England. My fathers mother and brothers later returned to South Africa, but my father remained in England until his death in 1974. My mother, Winifred, born 1910, was from Yorkshire. Her father was a schoolteacher, and her mother was

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from the small village of Dent in the Yorkshire Dales. 1 My parents met as undergraduates at the University of Leeds. After graduating, my father entered theological college. Upon ordination he served as curate in Liverpool. Meanwhile my mother had qualified as a teacher and found her first job. They were married in 1937. In that year my father was appointed to be a vicar. 2 Between the ages of five and nine I attended Notre Dame Roman Catholic primary school in Wigan. From 1948 onwards I attended boarding schools, first Broadwater Manor House preparatory school in Worthing, Sussex, and then, from 1951, the (minor) public school St Johns Leatherhead, Surrey. My parents could not have afforded from their own resources to educate me at independent schools, but I was supported from the age of nine onwards by scholarships. 3 At sixteen I decided to teach myself Esperanto. I quickly attained fluency and read widely: not only original works of literature but also translations which

gave me a nodding acquaintance at least, via Esperanto, with some of the masterpieces of the literatures of Italian, Polish, Hungarian, Finnish and Japanese. By the time I went up to Cambridge I had read Mickiewicz and Madách. Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A Page 7 4 I also taught myself shorthand: not the Pitman shorthand commonly used in Britain, but Gregg shorthand. I achieved a respectable speed in writing it. The snag was that in class I tended to write down indiscriminately what the teacher said, instead of producing a precis as the longhand user has to. This made my notes too prolix. Once I realised the problem I decided to use shorthand only when a verbatim note was required. 5 Leaving school in 1957, I had a few months to spare before going up to university. Given that I was interested in languages my parents arranged an exchange with a German family. I spent six weeks in Kiel with the von Briskorns. This was my first trip abroad, and I was determined to put it

to good use. Both Klaus and I took the task of my learning German very seriously. 6 It was at Cambridge that I first came seriously into contact with phonetics and linguistics. For the third year we had to choose between philosophy, archaeology, history, literature and language. I chose language. This mainly meant comparative philology under the guidance of Sidney Allen who introduced us to linguistics. Latin and Greek had hitherto been purely written languages for me and it was a revelation to be taught that they had phonemic systems and allophones. Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A Page 8 T a s k T w o : O n e long t e x t (30 minutes) Read the following text and then write one - three paragraphs of continuous prose (about 150-200 words) that includes answers to the following questions: 1 2 • • • • • What did Roger do in his life apart from singing, touring and song writing? What musical s u c c e s s e s did Roger have in non-English Note: not all the

information in the text is relevant for the tasks; it may not be necessary to read the whole text. Please feel free to mark the text if you wish. Do not include information that does not specifically answer these questions. Do not include any direct or indirect spoken quotations within your answer. Do not include any directly copied-out pieces of original text within your answer. Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A Page 9 Roger Whittaker: a life of song Saul Denman reviews the life of singer and songwriter, Roger Whittaker. Since 1962 Roger Whittaker has become an outstanding star all over the world, enjoying a series of highly acclaimed albums and a string of hit singles that includes such classics as Durham Town, New World in the Morning and The Last Farewell. He has amassed worldwide record sales nearing 50 million. His success has embraced the United States and Canada as well as Australia, New Zealand, Scandinavia, Holland, Belgium, France and Austria. In Germany alone,

more than 10 million albums have been sold in the last six years. Roger was born in Kenya in 1936. His parents came from Staffordshire in England: his father originated from a family of grocers; his mother was a teacher. The music of East Africa left a mark on Rogers childhood. "In over 30 years of singing and playing musical sounds the wonderful drumming and those marvellous, infectious rhythms - have played a great part in everything I have ever written and sung." In school he was a member of the school choir and gained top grades. He wanted to become a teacher or a doctor However, after leaving school Roger was conscripted into the military and spent the next two years in the army. In 1956 Roger was demobilised and decided that it was time to concentrate on a career in medicine. He enrolled at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, but he wasnt ready for study. After 18 months he left the university and joined the civil service education department to try teaching.

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"It was a very exciting time. I was teaching - and loved it! However, this was just an apprenticeship. He could go no further because he had no qualifications. He applied and obtained a place at the University of Bangor in Wales. Roger arrived in Britain in 1959. For the next three years, he studied zoology, biochemistry and marine biology. However, during his early days of teaching in Africa, Roger had continued to sing and he had by now started to write his own songs. He made a demo track that found its way to a major music publisher. Before he knew it, Roger was back in the studio recording his first single, The Charge of the Light Brigade. Faced with the dilemma of which career to choose, Roger chose music. Finding himself an agent and manager, Roger set out to establish his name and almost immediately was booked for a summer season in Northern Ireland. He then spent the next five years learning his trade. In the spring of 1964, Roger met his future wife, Natalie. By 1967,

Roger was slowly beginning to make his name. He had enjoyed several record releases, though a big hit single still escaped his clutches. Still, he was earning a healthy living and appearing occasionally on radio and television. Roger was asked to join a British team for the annual music festival at Knokke, Belgium. Singing If I Were a Rich Man and his own composition Mexican Whistler he helped Britain to win the competition. He also emerged as the hit of the entire contest and picked up the coveted and highly prestigious Press Prize. Mexican Whistler soon reached number one in three different European countries. Suddenly, Roger Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A was inundated with offers to tour Europe and star on the major television programmes. In Britain, however, he was still virtually unknown. In 1969, his British record company issued a new single; another of his own compositions with the unusual title of Durham Town. "I just didnt have any faith in that song at

all," Roger admits. "Far from promoting the single in Britain, I went off to Finland for a cabaret season and television appearances." By the time he returned in November, Durham Town was rapidly climbing the British charts. One of Whittakers best-loved songs is The Last Farewell. The lyrics to the song were written by a Birmingham silversmith, who had entered a competition in which the winning lyrics would be sent to Whittaker and recorded. Although The Last Farewell was not the winner, the song was nonetheless included on an album along with the winner. The Last Farewell went on to become a massive hit all over the world, reaching the coveted Number One slot in 11 different countries. Germany, particularly, has been a highly successful market for Roger over the years. It all started back in 1976 when he undertook his first major concert tour of the country, following the success of The Last Farewell. Record success, however, has established Whittakers name in the

country and hoisted him to superstardom. His sings and records in the German language. Indeed, in 1985 he was acclaimed as the countrys most successful recording artist, singing in the German language, a distinction no other major international record star could claim. Page 10 In conjunction with his first American tour in 1980, Roger launched a major international song writing competition, Children Helping Children, from the United Nations in New York through UNESCO. Children from all over the world were asked to submit lyrics and poems on the subject of promoting peace and understanding, the best of which Roger would put to music and record. In 1997 Roger released A Perfect Day, His Greatest Hits and More. The title track to this album features Roger singing a sentimental duet with his daughter Jessica. Now established at the very pinnacle of international stardom the sheer magnitude of the demand to see Roger Whittaker performing in concert or on tour or on television has resulted

in an extensive almost non­ stop round of engagements all over the world, making him one of the most travelled entertainers in show business history. In 1982 Roger was persuaded to make a movie in his native Kenya. It was an ambitious project, and for six weeks the film cameras followed him throughout the East African country as Roger related the story of Kenyas history - the British colonial development and the rediscovery of his homeland - through his own unique words and music. In 2001, after an extensive German tour Roger decided on retirement. However, having moved to Ireland and settling down by the River Shannon, he was soon inspired to start writing again, and needless to say, like all artists missed the roar of the crowds. So, in 2003 he again toured Germany to great acclaim and has recorded a new German Christmas album Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A Page 11 T a s k T h r e e : W r i t i n g (20 minutes) You have seen t h e f o l l o w i n g notice in t h e local

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paper. Request for Planning Permission Brighton Leisure plc have requested permission to turn 148b Churchill Road into a bar and restaurant. Further information about this planning application can be found at the City Council office. Any comments in support of or in opposition to the request for planning permission th must be presented by 3 0 April. Youve also received this l e t t e r f r o m t h e local residents c o m m i t t e e : Dear Neighbour, Have you seen this?! What a disgrace. Im trying to get as many people as possible to write to the council and complain. Please join our campaign; we must stop this. Ive added some of my notes to the leaflet to give you some ideas. Thank you for your help in fighting this terrible plan. Marge Watkins Head of local residents association Enclosed w i t h t h e letter is a copy of this leaflet w i t h some of Marges notes on a "Post-it". Using t h e i n f o r m a t i o n above: W r i t e a letter to t h e local council opposing

t h e application, including some of this information and anything else y o u wish t o add. W r i t e 120-150 words. Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A ANSWER SHEET Page 12 TEST 1: READING & W R I T I N G PART A - ANSWER SHEET - Task O n e Candidate N u m b e r : E A Centre Code T a s k O n e : P a r a g r a p h H e a d i n g s - Questions 1-6 Question Your Answer 1 2 3 4 5 6 Task T w o : A Long T e x t Please w r i t e your answers on a separate sheet of paper. Task T h r e e : W r i t i n g Please w r i t e your answers on a separate sheet of paper. Candidate Code LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY Test 1 Reading & Writing Part B Candidate Number: Time: 45 minutes • Answer all the questions • Write all your answers on the answer sheet • You must not speak to the other candidates Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part B Page 14 T a s k O n e : T h r e e Reading T e x t s (15 minutes) - Questions 1-6 Konglish Replaces Good English

How bad can bad English get? Very bad indeed, in the view of a commentary published in the Korea Herald, in which the writer laments the state of "Konglish", the hybrid of jazzy Korean and messy English that, "like heavy traffic is an unpleasant but tolerable side of life" in the East Asian capital. Well, maybe not quite so tolerable these days. The recent opening of a bedazzling new multibillion dollar airport in Seoul, where as many as 49 signs were subsequently discovered to have fallen prey to writers of Konglish, spoke "volumes about the state of the translation and proof-reading industry in Korea," the paper said. A few weeks previously, the I. vernacular newspaper Dong-a Ilbo had reported on a study conducted by Lee Ye Shik, a professor of English education at Kyungpook National University, that found hundreds of similar examples of Konglish in four first-year junior high school textbooks. "Bad English in textbooks is particularly troubling,

because it helps reproduce the passivity towards good English that has permitted bad English to prosper in Korea for so long," the Herald concluded. "If students are exposed to mistakes that many teachers will teach as good English, then how can English education in Korea improve?" The Korean Herald thinks the problems at the airport... A. ...are embarrassing for Koreans. B. ...make matters worse. C. ...illustrate how bad the situation is. D. ...were a very expensive mistake. 2. The Korean Herald thinks that... A. ...teachers dont use coursebooks enough. B. ...teachers teach good English. C. ...English language education in Korea makes matters worse. D. ...there are too many high school textbooks. Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part B Page 15 Text 2 How do you say, er, phrase book? SHALL we go out together?" "Yes! I agree!" "Do you like spaghetti westerns?" "No, thank you!" "Kabuki theatre? Hot spas?" "Stop it

or I will scream!" There is nothing like a phrase book to make you feel divided by a common language. The agonising time lapses as you thumb through to the right section. The unsuitable expressions on offer when you get there. The sensation of panic when someone replies and you have to begin the whole process again. But for all that, the phrase book is a useful hybrid - part-grammar, partdictionary, part-idiots guide developed for those of us who like travelling but do not have the time, or perhaps the inclination, to learn a language from the roots up. The modern phrase book emphasises the cultural 3. background behind the phrases. There are more colloquialisms and more accurate and user-friendly pronunciation guidelines. The idea is to use your phrase book with, rather than at, the people you want to talk to. I look for one, which is small and robust, with easily navigable contents. The more grammar and dictionary entries the better. And I am constantly amazed by the absence

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of three chunks which to me seem absolutely essential: "There is/are"; "I am learning Japanese" (rather than "I do not speak Japanese", which tends to kill a conversation); and "How do you say . . . in Japanese?". Anyone who has ever tried to say "How do you say, How do you say??" will sympathise. The writer thinks that phrase books are... A. .. .fundamentally flawed. B. ...good for learning a language from scratch. C. .. .not as good as they used to be. D. ...inconsistent about including the most useful phrases. 4. According to the author, what happens when somebody says I dont speak Japanese? A. People start speaking English. B. People dont believe her. C. People dont speak to her. D. People dont understand her. Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part B Page 16 Text 3 L a n g u a g e Holidays: T h e E s s e n t i a l s Report filed August 2005 FIRST things first. A language-learning holiday is no place for a

honeymoon, pleasingly eccentric though this may sound. You will end up arguing about the use of the subjunctive when you should be arguing about more interesting things. A language holiday is also no place for absolute beginners, whatever the adverts say. Simply being in a foreign country no more gives you immediate access to its language than being in a laboratory gives you immediate access to astrophysics. If you dont know the basics - "Yes", "No", "Take your hand off my knee" - attend evening classes in Britain first. They are cheaper and, when you go to the pub afterwards, the staff will understand what you are ordering. Language holidays are for improving, not launching. The third opening caveat is not even to contemplate going with someone much more gifted than you at languages. She - and I use the feminine pronoun advisedly - will grab the teachers eye, the key parts in in-class role-playing and the attention of swarthy locals in after-class outings

. . . while you struggle to m a s t e r directions to the station. You will get depressed, learn nothing, fall out and so lose a friend or, in extreme cases, a wife. If you cannot go alone - which is ideal - book with someone who is not quite as good as you, so that the ability gap, while favouring you, threatens nothing. 5. The author thinks it is a bad idea for complete beginners to go on a language holiday, because A. you learn more in evening classes at home. B. you cant learn other subjects at the same time. C. you cant communicate with anybody. D. you might get harassed. 6. In the highlighted text, the author implies that... A. .. .women flirt with the teachers. B. ...women are better language learners than men. C. ...better students go on more after-class outings. D. ...local people prefer female students. Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part B T a s k T w o : C h o i c e of Tasks (30 minutes) • Write only ONE of the following tasks. Write 250 - 300 words.

A. A movie magazine has said that it needs new movie reviewers. Would you like to work for Film World? Show us what you can do. Write a review of a new film has been released depicting some historical events. (It can be a real or an imaginary film) If we like what we see - well take you onto the reviewing team. Write a review. B. You have been approached by the local Transport Authority who are researching attitudes to public transport. You have been asked to write a report outlining your personal experiences of the strengths and weaknesses of public transport in your area, making recommendations for changes. Write a report. c. Write an article. A university magazine from another country is running a series of articles on "Three best and three worst". They have asked you what the three best and the three worst things are about your town. They are particularly interested to get information about things off the normal tourist track - the things that only locals notice.

They hope to get an amusing article that will entertain and inform their readers - it might also encourage visitors to come to your town (so dont make it too negative!). Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part B ANSWER SHEET Page 18 TEST 1: READING & W R I T I N G PART B - ANSWER SHEET - T a s k O n e Candidate N u m b e r : E A Centre Code T a s k O n e : Reading T e x t s - Questions 1-6 Question Your Answer I 2 3 4 5 6 T a s k T w o : C h o i c e o f Tasks Please w r i t e your answers on separate sheets. Candidate Code LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY Test 2 - Listening Time: approx. 45 minutes • Answer all the questions • You may write on the question paper but make sure you write all your answers on the separate answer sheet (You will have 5 minutes at the end of the exam for this) Test 2 - Listening Page 20 T a s k O n e : S h o r t conversations - Questions 1-6 You will hear John, who is looking for a new job, looking through

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advertisements and talking about them with his two friends, Emma and Sarah. You will hear six conversations. For each conversation: • select one item from List A to show what they are talking about, AND • select one item from List B to show what John feels about it. It will not be necessary to use all the items. • Tick the right letters next to the question number. You will hear each recording twice. List A: What theyre talking about List B: How John feels a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k) 1) m) n) o) p) The free newspaper The Renfield Observer Job Finder Weekly The Internet The Job Centre Someone Sarah knows The "yellow pages" telephone directory A notice board enthusiastic disappointed confused hopeful cynical wary pessimistic worried T a s k T w o : M a k i n g notes - Questions 7-9 Listen to the following lecture about large dams. • • • • The talk will pause at 3 points when you will be asked a question. Take notes while you listen. You will have 2

minutes to write each answer. Each question is worth three marks. The recording will only be played once. W R I T E YOUR NOTES ON A SEPARATE SHEET, BUT R E M E M B E R TO COPY YOUR ANSWERS ONTO THE SEPARATE ANSWER SHEET. Test 2 - Listening Page 21 T a s k T h r e e : Radio P r o g r a m m e - Questions 10-19 You are going to hear part of a radio programme discussion about threats to the survival of pandas in China. The participants are the programmes host; Dr Chi, an expert from Haidan Panda Reservation and Jane Greenaway from the Environmental Action Centre in the United States. • On the test paper you have 10 multiple-choice questions about the programme. • Choose the best response (A, B, C or D) for questions 10-19. • Tick A, B, C or D on the answer sheet. • You will hear the recording twice. • You have two minutes to read the questions before the recording starts. 10. 11. Haidan A. B. C. D. forest reserve was set up ... ... because there was a need to

survey the panda population. ... because three surveys showed low panda numbers. ... to try and halt the decline in panda numbers. ... because there are fewer than 1000 pandas in Haidan. Dr Chi believes that the number of pandas in the reserve ... A. dropped until 1974 and has risen since. B. dropped slightly between 1974 and 1986 but dramatically since. C. has risen steadily since 1974. D. has been dropping since 1974. 12. Jane Greenaway thinks the numbers of pandas in the forest reserve are falling, because ... A. the trees outside the reserve are being chopped down. B. the trees inside the reserve are being chopped down. C. the trees are deteriorating. D. the locals have stopped cutting down trees. 13. How many people does Dr Chi believe visited the reserve last year? A. 3,000. B. 5,000. C. 30,000. D. 150,000. 14. Dr Chi thinks the root cause of decline in panda numbers in the Haidan reserve is ... A. trees are being chopped down. B. tourists need support services and

industries. C. Jane Greenaway. D. the locals have stopped cutting down trees. Test 2 - Listening 15. 16. 17. 18. Page 22 W h a t is the significance of smoked pork to Dr Chis argument? A. People need w o o d t o smoke p o r k . B. Smoked p o r k is a regional speciality and attracts t o u r i s t s . C. T h e electricity used to smoke p o r k is expensive. D. Panda cubs reared inside h o l l o w trees often get b u r n t . According to Dr Chi, how does cutting gaps in the forest reduce panda numbers? A. It causes infertility. B. It divides groups of pandas. C. It forces pandas to find n e w partners. D. It forces pandas to breed in certain areas. W h a t does Jane Greenaway think about the local population? A. They make t o o many souvenirs. B. They abuse t h e pandas by using t h e m in sports events and festivals. C. They w o u l d like to see t h e back of t h e tourists. D. T h e i r numbers are g r o w i n g t o o fast. Considering the programme as

a whole, what does Dr Chi think about Jane Greenaway? A. She thinks Jane Greenaway is a naive ecological campaigner. B. She agrees w i t h Jane Greenaways argument but finds her behaviour C. She distrusts Jane Greenaways evidence. D. She thinks that Jane Greenaway is t r y i n g to escape personal responsibility. inappropriate. 19. Considering the programme as a whole, what does Jane Greenaway think about Dr Chi? A. She thinks Dr Chi is avoiding agreeing t h a t locals are mainly responsible. B. She thinks Dr Chi wants t h e pandas to be kept primarily as a t o u r i s t attraction. C. She thinks Dr Chi is rude but mostly right. D. She thinks Dr Chi wants to i n t r o d u c e c o n t r o l s t o o fast. Page 23 Test 2 - Listening ANSWER SHEET TEST 2: LISTENING - Candidate E ANSWER SHEET Number: A Candidate Code Centre Code T a s k O n e : S h o r t C o n v e r s a t i o n s - Questions 1-6 Question I 2 3 4 5 6 Your Answer (List A) Your Answer

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(List B) Test 2 - Listening ANSWER SHEET Page 24 T a s k T w o : M a k i n g N o t e s - Questions 7-9 7 8 9 T a s k T h r e e : A Radio P r o g r a m m e - Questions 10-19 Question Your Answer Question 10 15 11 16 12 17 13 18 14 19 Your Answer LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY Test 3 Grammar & Vocabulary Time: 30 minutes + dictation • Answer all the questions • Write all your answers on the separate answer sheet • You must not speak to the other candidates Test 3 - Grammar & Vocabulary Page 26 T a s k O n e : D i c t a t i o n - Kiwis In this part of the test you will hear a text about Kiwis. • You must write down every word in the text on the numbered lines on the separate Answer Sheet. • You will be marked for getting the correct words and correct spelling. • You will hear the text three times: First - you will hear the whole text. Then - you will hear small pieces of the text. These will each be repeated once. •

You may make notes on this sheet of paper but please make sure you write your answers on the Answer Sheet provided. You will hear the following names: Tane Mahuta, Maori, New Zealand Your notes D O N T FORGET to copy your answers onto the separate answer sheet! Test 3 - Grammar & Vocabulary Page 27 T a s k T w o : M u l t i p l e C h o i c e G a p Fill (15 minutes) - Questions 1-15 Complete the following article by choosing the correct words from the four possible alternatives. Advertising to Kids From an advertisers viewpoint, children are a splendid E x a m p l e . They watch lots of television; they spend lots of pocket money. No wonder many people worry about the influence of marketing on minors. Increasingly, campaigners are demanding that countries 1 restrictions on advertising aimed at children. In Europe, legislation to 2 marketing to children is spreading. Greece, where all toy advertising on television is banned between before 22h00, has considered 3 the ban to

all products aimed at children. Italy, Poland, Belgium and Ireland are all debating the issue. Stricter measures may 4 ahead: Sweden plans to use its six months in the presidents chair of the European Union to encourage a 5 of the EUs relatively liberal rules on TV advertising. The campaigners 6 that children are too naive to distinguish between advertisements and genuine programming. Even those children who can 7 such a distinction, he argues, might still be manipulated by an advert into pestering their parents to buy a product. But advertisers insist that a widespread move to ban childrens ads would 8 . Their main argument is that bans would 9 to worse childrens programming on television, fewer educational resources in schools and higher prices for toys. There may be something in this. One big American toy manufacturer in Greece says that, as a 10 result of the ban, the company offered wholesalers a more limited selection of new toys this Christmas than it did in other European

markets. Commercial marketing in schools also has 11 . Britains government, for one, wants more business involvement in schools, after the success of 12 such as a loyalty scheme linked to Tesco, a food wholesaler. This 13 parents spending on food with points that go towards school computers. In fact, advertisers are not as influential as they seem. A recent study of 5,000 parents in 20 European countries found that the majority did not 14 advertising among the top five influences on their children: parents, schools and other families, among others, were seen as far more important. "A pestering child is a badly brought-up child," says one of the researchers. This highlights the most important case against 15 children from marketing—that parents and teachers have a responsibility to teach children about the realities of a commercial world, just as they teach them how to cross a road safely. Test 3 - Grammar & Vocabulary Page 28 Questions f o r T a s k T w o :

Example: A. people B. crowd C. audience D. viewers T h e c o r r e c t a n s w e r is C. 1. A. implore B. impose C. improve D. impair 2. A.curb B. demolish C. destroy D. diminish 3. A. expanding B. stretching C. extending D. covering 4. A. follow B. lead C. introduce D. lie 5. A. knotting B. narrowing C. changing D. tightening 6. A. claim B. disagree C. ensure D. demand 7. A. take B. have C. make D. reach 8. A. follow B. effect C. backfire D. counteract 9. A. make B. lead C. result D. mean 10. A. straight B. concrete C. ongoing D. direct 11. A. benefits B. profits C. strengths D. reasons 12. A. inventions B. inventories C. initiatives D. initiations 13. A. gives B. rewards C. provides D. offers 14. A. find B. rate C. allow D. view 15. A. forbidding B. covering C. shielding D. stopping Test 3 - Grammar & Vocabulary Page 29 T a s k T h r e e : G a p Fill (I5minutes) - Questions 16-30 C o m p l e t e

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the f o l l o w i n g article b y w r i t i n g t h e c o r r e c t w o r d s o n y o u r answer sheet. Dracula It is unclear why Bram Stoker chose Vlad Dracula, a fifteenth century Romanian prince, as the model Example his fictional vampire. Many believe that Stoker might have heard Draculas name from a Hungarian friend of his. 16 the name came to Stokers attention, his cruelty readily loaned itself to his purposes. The events of Draculas life took place in a region that was still very medieval, 17 in Stokers time. The Balkans had 18 recently shaken off the Turkish yoke when Stoker started working on his novel. Transylvania had long been a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but it too 19 endured a long period of Turkish domination. The legend of the vampire was and 20 is deeply rooted in that region. There have always been vampire-like creatures in the mythologies of many cultures. However, the vampire, 21 he became known in Europe and hence America, largely originated in Eastern

Europe. An epidemic of vampirism swept 22 Eastern Europe and the Balkans at the beginning in the late seventeenth century. From the Balkans it spread westward into Germany, Italy, France, England and Spain. Travellers returning from the Balkans brought with them tales of 23 undead. igniting an interest in the vampire that has continued to this day. Philosophers in the West began to study the phenomenon around this time as well. It was also during this period 24 authors and playwrights first began to explore the vampire myth. Given the history of the vampire in Europe, 25 is perhaps natural that Stoker should place his great vampire in the heart of the region that gave birth to the myth . 26 Stoker had selected Transylvania for his story, Vlad Dracula stood out 27 one of the most notorious rulers of the region. He was obscure enough that few would recognise the name and for those who 28 know him for his acts of brutality; Dracula was a natural candidate for vampirism. 29 Stoker chose to

relocate his vampire from Wallachia to the north of Transylvania remains a mystery. However, outside of Stokers novel the name of Dracula was 30 linked with the myth of the vampire. Despite his inhuman cruelty, Dracula is remembered in Romania as a national hero who resisted the Turkish conquerors and asserted Romanian national sovereignty against the powerful Hungarian kingdom. Example: T h e c o r r e c t w o r d is for Test 3 - Grammar & Vocabulary ANSWER SHEET Page 30 TEST 3: GRAMMAR & VOCABULARY - A N S W E R S H E E T Candidate N u m b e r : E A Centre Code Task O n e : Dictation Candidate Code Test 3 - Grammar & Vocabulary ANSWER SHEET Page 31 Test 3 - Grammar & Vocabulary ANSWER SHEET T a s k T w o : M u l t i p l e C h o i c e G a p Fill - Questions 1-15 Question Your Answer 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 T a s k T h r e e : G a p Fill - Questions 16-30 Example For Do not write here 16 23 Do not write here 24 Do not write here 17 Do not write

here 18 Do not write here 19 Do not write here 20 Do not write here 21 Do not write here 22 Do not write here Do not write here 25 Do not write here 26 Do not write here 27 Do not write here 28 Do not write here 29 Do not write here 30 Do not write here Page 32 LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY Test 4 - Mediation Part A Candidate Number: Time: approx. 20 minutes • Answer all the questions • Write all your answers on the answer sheet (You will have 5 minutes at the end of the exam for this) • You must not speak to the other candidates Test 4 - Mediation - Part A Page 34 T a s k O n e : Dialogues - Questions /-6 • • • • • • • Help your friend who doesnt speak English. Mediate between the two people. If the person speaks in English, translate into Hungarian. If the person speaks in Hungarian, translate into English. The first two have been done for you. Do not translate every word. Translate only the basic meaning. Please remember

the quality of your language is also important. Each person will talk four times. You will hear each line twice. There will be a fifteen second pause between each line for you to write down the translation. At the end of the conversation you will have two minutes to check what you have written. Remember, you will not have time to translate every word. Ex 1 W r i t e in English Please spare me a moment - trying to talk to you Example: for hours Ex W r i t e in Hungarian Example: 2 1 W r i t e in English 2 W r i t e in Hungarian 3 W r i t e in English 4 W r i t e in Hungarian 5 W r i t e in English 6 W r i t e in Hungarian természetesen - nagyon sajnálom - először használjuk ezt a szállodát - ahogy ön látja problémák / nehéz helyzet Stop w r i t i n g w h e n y o u a r e t o l d t o d o so. LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY Test 4 - Mediation Part B Candidate Number: Time: 30 minutes • Answer all the questions • Write all your answers on

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the separate answer sheet • You must not speak to the other candidates Test 5 - Mediation - Part B Page 36 T a s k O n e : English i n t o H u n g a r i a n - A T e x t • Translate the English text into Hungarian. Be a Tooth Fairy Its a knee-jerk reaction. As soon as children squirm in their pushchairs, we thrust something sweet into their sticky little hands. We exchange sugar in return for short-term peace. But the toddler initially silenced by sweets becomes a monster once the sugar fix has worn off. Sugar can wreck a childs health. Excess sugar is converted to fat and leads to obesity. Parents are often more of a problem than children themselves, many thinking the natural flavours of good food cannot be enjoyed unless they are very sweet or have added sugar. This is nonsense. T a s k T w o : H u n g a r i a n i n t o English - A L e t t e r • Your friend has asked you to translate their letter into English. Tisztelt Uram! Panaszt szeretnék emelni egyik

szolgáltatásukkal kapcsolatban. Hirdetésükben olvastam, hogy gyermektáborokat szerveznek szakképzett nyelvtanárokkal szép környezetben. Megérkezésünk után derült ki, hogy a szállásul kijelölt faházak egy napégette mezőn vannak, tizenöt perc gyaloglásra a száz gyereket kiszolgáló öt zuhanytól. A „szakképzett nyelvtanárok" egyetemista diákok voltak, akik még egyetlen nyelvórát sem tartottak életükben, és igen gyenge készségeket mutattak fel a gyerekekkel való bánásmód terén. Következésképpen a regisztráció meglehetősen zűrzavaros volt. Ezenkívül, gyermekem vegetáriánus, de ebédnél kiderült, hogy a konyha nincs fölkészülve sem erre, sem más diétás igényekre. Tekintettel a fent vázolt körülményekre gyermekemet azonnal hazahoztam. Mivel önök nyilvánvalóan szerződésszegésben vannak, szeretném visszakapni a teljes befizetett összeget. Tisztelettel: Szíjjártó Kálmán Please continue on a separate sheet of

paper. LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY Test 5 - Speaking PROCEDURE, SCRIPT AND MATERIALS Time: approx. 17 minutes + 10 minutes preparation Test 5 -Procedure and Interlocutors Script Page 38 O u t l i n e o f Speaking E x a m Before the exam you have ten minutes preparation time in the preparation room. Here you receive your Test Entry Form and a Presentation topic sheet. You are allowed to use your dictionary to prepare your presentation. There will be two examiners in the exam room - the Interlocutor who is running the exam and the Assessor who is listening and evaluating - and two candidates at a time: This test will have three tasks: Task 1. W e l c o m e and Interview Timing • The Interlocutor will initiate conversations 2-3mins. • Candidate A will give a presentation 2 mins • Candidate B will start a short discussion with Candidate A on the previous presentation topic 1 min. 2. Presentation • Candidate B will give a presentation 2 mins. 3.

Collaborative Task • Candidate A will start a short • discussion with Candidate B on the previous presentation topic 1 min. • The Interlocutor will give you a collaborative task to do together 3-4 mins. Together with the welcome, setting up of tasks and closure the speaking task will be no longer than 17 minutes. The Interlocutor will speak from a script you can see on the following pages. You can also follow a sample speaking test on the accompanying CD. Test 5 -Procedure and Interlocutors Script Page 39 INTERLOCUTORS SCRIPT Welcome -Good morning / afternoon / evening. -My name is < name > and this is my colleague < name >. -Have you got your test entry forms? » > candidates hand over forms < « -Please also give me the tasks and your notes. Ill return these to you later. »> candidates hand over forms <« Task I: I n t e r v i e w -So you are < Candidate A name > and you are < Candidate 8 name > -Do you know each other? If yes

» > -Ask questions to find o u t and compare what things you have in common and what is different in your lives. If no » > -Please ask questions to find out more about the other person. If conversation needs encouragement »> -Please discuss w i t h each other what have been the most enjoyable and the most difficult things about learning English. Task 2: P r e s e n t a t i o n -In this part of the test, you are both going to give the presentation you prepared earlier. »> The Interlocutor gives Candidate A the topic list with the notes that he/she prepared before the exam «< -Which statement have you decided to talk about? Test 5 -Procedure and Interlocutors Script Page 40 -Good. < Candidate 8 name> I d like you to listen, and take notes. You may ask questions and make comments after the presentation. -<Candidate A nome>, you may use your notes but please do not read aloud from them. You may start when you are ready and I will stop you after about

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t w o minutes. All right? -You have 30 seconds to look through the information and your notes. »> 30 seconds - The candidate looks through his/her notes <« »> 2 minutes - The candidate gives his/her presentation using the notes <« Thank-you <Candidate A name>. <Candidate comment, or ask any questions now. 8 nome>, you may make any »> During the discussion as far as possible, the Interlocutor allows the candidates to discuss together. If necessary he/she uses appropriate phrases to move the discussion forward <« -Do you agree? -Which points do you agree / disagree with? -Would you add any points to the argument? -In your experience are the same things true / correct? » > 1 minute « < »> The Interlocutor gives Candidate B the topic list with notes that he/she prepared before the exam <« -Thank you. N o w < Candidate 8 name > its your t u r n . W h i c h statement have you decided to talk about? -Good. < Candidate A

name> Id like you to listen, and take notes. You may ask questions and make comments after the presentation. -<Candidate 8 name>, you may use your notes but please do not read aloud from them. You may start when you are ready and I will stop you after about t w o minutes. All right? Test 5 -Procedure and Interlocutors Script Page 41 -You have 30 seconds to look through the information and your notes. »> 30 second s- The candidate looks through his/her notes <« »> 2 minutes - The candidate gives his/her presentation using the notes <« -< Thank-you <Candidate 8 name>. <Candidate A name>> you may make any comment or ask any questions now. »> 1 minute < « -Thank-you. Task 3: C o l l a b o r a t i v e T a s k (usually 3 minutes; max 4 minutes) -For the final part of the test you are going to talk w i t h each other about a task I will show you. -Im just going to listen. Remember, we are interested in your skills at listening,

responding and negotiation as well as your ability to speak. »> The interlocutor picks up a Topic Sheet and places it in front of the candidates <« - Please look at the topic sheet. »> Interlocutor reads instructions from sheet <« - When you are ready please start. »> 3 minutes - Candidates discuss topic <« -Thank you. That is the end of the test. - Good bye. Have a nice weekend / day / evening. Test 5 - Speaking: Materials and Script Page 42 Task 3 - A Life in the city You have been asked to find photographs for the cover of a book of poetry called As the new century begins - Urban life at the turn of the millennium. Look at these pictures. First, look at each picture one by one and talk about what aspects of urban life it illustrates and how representative you think it is. Then, think of other images you could include instead. Finally, try to decide which images would be the most appropriate and why. Test 5 -Procedure and Interlocutors Script

Page 43 Task 3 - B Key moments in human life You have been asked to recommend photographs for the front cover of a book of poetry called Key moments in human life. Look at the pictures below. First, look at each picture one by one and talk about which key moments it illustrates and how representative you think it is. Then, think of other images you could include as well. Finally, try to decide which images would be the most appropriate and why. Test 5 -Procedure and Interlocutors Script Page 44 CANDIDATES PREPARATION MATERIALS P r e s e n t a t i o n topics f o r C a n d i d a t e A : (10 minutes to prepare a 2 minute talk) Choose O N E of the following statements and prepare a 2 minute presentation on the topic. AI A2 A3 A4 Dreams are important. You re no-one until someone loves you. Smoking is just a slow form of suicide. A 4-day work week is a bad idea. • You can agree or disagree with the statement - but keep to the topic • You may use a dictionary • You must not

speak to the other candidates • You may make notes but do not read aloud from these notes in the test • Take this sheet of paper and your notes into the examination • In the test, give your notes to the examiner when asked You now have 10 minutes to prepare your presentation, organise your thoughts and make notes on a separate sheet. Somebody will take you to the test room when it is your turn. P r e s e n t a t i o n topics f o r C a n d i d a t e B (10 minutes to prepare a 2 minute talk) Choose ONE of the following statements and prepare a 2 minute presentation on the topic. BI B2 B3 B4 People prefer optimists. Television destroys imagination. Manufactured pop is not as good as the real thing. Family is more important than friendship. • You can agree or disagree with the statement - but keep to the topic • You may use a dictionary • You must not speak to the other candidates • You may make notes but do not read aloud from these notes in the test • Take this sheet

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of paper and your notes into the examination • In the test, give your notes to the examiner when asked You now have 10 minutes to prepare your presentation, organise your thoughts and make notes on a separate sheet. Somebody will take you to the test room when it is your turn. LEVEL C1 • OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY ANSWER KEYS Test 1: • • • Test 2: • • Reading & Writing The Answer Key Marking Schemes Listening The Answer Key The Tapescript Test 3: Grammar and Vocabulary • The Answer Key • The Tapescript for Task 1 Test 4: • • • Mediation The Answer Key The Tapescript for Part A Marking schemes for Part B Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A - ANSWER KEY + MARKING SCHEME 1 Page 46 T E S T I: R E A D I N G & W R I T I N G P A R T A - A N S W E R KEY T a s k O n e : P a r a g r a p h Headings - Questions 1-6 1 H 2 A 3 D 4 I 5 G 6 E T a s k T w o : O n e long t e x t - Public A r t You will get one point for each piece of information

involved in your writing Question 1 What did Roger do in his life apart from singing, touring and song writing? Question 2 What musical s u c c e s s e s did Roger have in non-English speaking countries? became a soldier studied medicine and zoology Press Prize (Belgium) Having a number one hit (several countries) 1985 Germanys most successful recording artist. teaching organised a song competition Mark Scheme You will get an overall mark for your written performance 5 A very successful attempt. All the information is relevant and clearly included in answer to the questions. A wide range of grammar vocabulary and cohesive devices used to produce natural language. They may be some slips but they do not interfere with meaning. 4 3 Most of the information is relevant and part of a generally successful and coherent response to the questions An adequate range of vocabulary, grammar and cohesive devices is used to complete the task. They may be some errors but they do not generally

impede meaning. 2 1 0 An unsuccessful attempt. Some relevant information may be included but the response does not address the questions. Range of grammar, vocabulary and cohesive devices inadequate to clearly complete the task. There are a number of errors that sometimes impede meaning. Insufficient language for assessment Test 1 - Reading & Writing Part A - ANSWER KEY + MARKING SCHEME 1 Page 47 TEST 1: R E A D I N G & W R I T I N G P A R T B - A N S W E R KEY Task O n e : Reading T e x t s - Questions 1-6 1 c 2 C 3 4 D C 5 C 6 B Use t h e m a r k i n g s c h e m e s b e l o w t o a w a r d a m a r k o u t o f 2 5 mark 5 4 3 2 1 0 Coherence and Cohesion Structure: Clear Purpose: Clear. Information: Well organised Cohesive devices: Used to link naturally Reference: Skilled use Structure: Adequate Purpose: Mostly clear. Information: Some confusion Cohesive devices: Good Reference:Simple use Structure: Muddled Purpose: Unclear. Information: Very confused

Cohesive devices: only basic cds used / cds used wrongly Reference:Simple / none Not enough language to make an assessment. mark 5 Range and Accuracy Range: Wide mark 5 Appropriacy Style: Appropriate to genre Errors: Almost none Register: Appropriate range of registers 4 3 Range: Adequate 4 3 Errors: Some but do not significantly impede meaning 2 1 Range: Narrow 2 1 Errors: A number of significant errors 0 Not enough language to make an assessment. Style: Usually appropriate to genre Register: Limited exponents but awareness of register is shown Style: Inappropriate to genre Register: Minimal 0 Not enough language to make an assessment. Test 3 -Grammar & Vocabulary - ANSWER KEY mark 10 Task Achievement Task achieved at a very high level Intention: Entirely clear Instructions: Completely followed Effect: A v. positive effect on the target reader Outcome: Sure to achieve a successful outcome. Content: All relevant details included Some original ideas or

presentation 9 8 Task well achieved Intention: Generally clear Instructions: All important ones followed Effect: A positive effect on the target reader Outcome: Sure to achieve a successful outcome. Content: Most relevant details included Some original ideas or presentation 7 6 Task achieved, some gaps Intention: Clear in most areas Instructions: All important ones followed Effect: A generally positive effect on the reader Outcome: Likely to achieve a successful outcome. Content: Many relevant details included 5 4 Task entirely unachieved Intention: Unclear in some areas Instructions: Some key instructions not followed Effect: The reader may be confused Outcome: Unlikely t achieve successful outcome Content: Some irrelevant information Some important details left out 3 2 Task entirely unachieved Intention: Very unclear. Instructions: Most / all not followed Effect: Very negative. Outcome: Will not achieve a successful outcome. Content: Omission, irrelevance. 1 0 Task

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unattempted / partially attempted Not enough language to make an assessment. Page 48 Test 2 -Listening - TAPESCRIPTS Page 49 T E S T 2: L I S T E N I N G - A N S W E R K E Y Task O n e : S h o r t C o n v e r s a t i o n s - Questions 1-6 1 A L 2 C J 4 D 3 G O 5 E K I 6 B J Task T w o : D a m s - Questions 7-9 7 5 - minimum height if volume is more than 3, 000, 000 cubic metres (1) 15 - minimum height of large dam from foundations (1) 3, 000, 000 - reservoir volume in cubic metres(l) 8 9 3 of the following • fragmented / transformed the worlds rivers • millions of people displaced • debt burden • cost overruns • destruction of ecosystems • destruction of fishery resources • inequitable sharing of costs and benefits bring to the table all whose rights are involved (1) negotiate outcomes in order to • increase effectiveness (1) • eliminate bad options (1) Task T h r e e : A Radio P r o g r a m m e - Questions 10-19 10 C 11 D 12 B 13 D 14 B 15 A

16 B 17 D 18 A 19 A Test 2 -Listening - TAPESCRIPTS Page 50 TAPESCIPTS T e x t s for T a s k O n e : S h o r t conversations I. Emmat: John: Emma: John: Emma: John: Youre not going to find your dream job in any of these you know. Not so sure - I mean, look at this - a whole side of classifieds. I dont recognise it. Thats not the local paper, is it? No - its a new free rag theyre posting through all the letterboxes. Its not bad - though its mainly ads for furniture shops and loans and things like that. Driving lessons and so on. And you really think youll find something there? Well - maybe not - but I might as well look, dont you think? 2. Emma: John: What about this - it seems a bit more specialised. No vicarage tea parties gets straight to the point Yeah - thats what I thought when I bought it - but - look more closely almost all the ads are for sales positions - you know just working on a commission basis. I know what that means - I walk from door to door all day and

if Im lucky I get one percent of the one sale I make. Look they all say "first step on a new career" - Thank you - but thats not a first step Im gonna take. 3. Emma: John Emma: John: Maybe youre going about it the wrong way. Shouldnt you just decide what you want to do first of all - then target the places you want to work. You know - you want to work for an estate agent - then you flick through this - C . . . D . . . E . . . here we are estate agent then you just call them up and sell yourself. Oh I know I should take the initiative a bit more - but Im just so hopeless at selling myself. Id never persuade anyone that I was worth inviting in. Its a good idea Emma - for someone like you - but theres no danger of it working with me. Well, I heard somewhere about this guy who got one through the web actually. Just typed in "job" and "high salary" or something like that and it spat out seven or eight opportunities. Hes on about 30K now. Goes to the

Bahamas for his hols. Now thats a really good idea. Why didnt I think of it? That sounds like just what the doctor ordered. Test 2 -Listening - TAPESCRIPTS Page 51 5. Emma: John: You know how I got the work Im doing now? The place just down the High Street - you know they give you an interview and talk you through whats available. Theres hundreds of things going - but you wouldnt want to touch most of them. I dont know if I was lucky or what - but I really like what Im doing - and its well paid. Well yes - I could go there - but ah - I just dont know what to do - there just seem to be so many options and I cant seem to work out whats best to concentrate my energies on. 6. John: Oh - Ive been through every ad in the Observer - nothing. I feel so down theres just nothing for me. I was sure that this week thered be one. T e x t for T a s k T w o : M a k i n g notes Listen to the following lecture about large dams. The talk will pause at three points, when you will be asked a

question. So take notes while you listen. Each question is worth three marks. The first question will be about the definition of a large dam. Dams have been built for thousands of years - dams to manage flood waters, to harness water as hydropower, to supply water to drink or for industry, or to irrigate fields. By 1950, governments, or in some countries the private sector, were building increasing numbers of dams as populations increased and national economies grew. At least 45 000 large dams have been built as a response to meet an energy or water need. Today nearly half of the worlds rivers have at least one large dam. What exactly is a large dam? According to the International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD), a large dam is 15 metres or more high from the foundation. If dams are between 5-15 metres high and have a reservoir volume of more than 3 million cubic metres they are also classified as large dams. Using this definition, there are more than 45 000 large dams around the

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world. Question 7: The speaker mentioned the following numbers: 5, 15 and 3 million. What do these numbers refer to? (Two minute pause) Test 2 -Listening - TAPESCRIPTS Page 52 The next question will be about the drawbacks of large dams. Listen and take notes. As we start the new century, one-third of the countries in the world rely on hydropower for more than half their electricity supply, and large dams generate 19% of electricity overall. Half the worlds large dams were built exclusively or primarily for irrigation, and some 30-40% of the 271 million hectares irrigated worldwide rely on dams. Other goals include creating income from export earnings, either through direct sales of electricity or by selling cash crops or processed products from electricity-intensive industry such as aluminium refining. Clearly, dams can play an important role in meeting peoples needs. But the last 50 years have also highlighted the performance and the social and environmental impact of large

dams. They have fragmented and transformed the worlds rivers, while global estimates suggest that 40-80 million people have been displaced by reservoirs. As the basis for decision-making has become more open, inclusive and transparent, in many countries the decision to build a large dam has been increasingly contested, to the point where the future of large dam-building in many countries is in question. The enormous investments and widespread impact of large dams have seen conflicts flare up over the siting and impact of large dams - both those in place and those on the drawing board, making large dams one of the most hotly contested issues in sustainable development today. Proponents point to the social and economic development demands that dams are intended to meet, such as irrigation, electricity, flood control and water supply. Opponents point to the adverse impact of dams, such as debt burden, cost overruns, displacement and impoverishment of people, destruction of important

ecosystems and fishery resources, and the inequitable sharing of costs and benefits. Question 8: What are some problems of large dams according to their opponents? (Two minute pause) Test 2 -Listening - TAPESCRIPTS Page 53 The next question will be about the conclusions of the World Commission on dams. Listen and take notes. With these conflicts and pressures in mind, the World Commission on Dams began its work in May 1998. After more than two years of intense study, dialogue with those for and against large dams, and reflection, the Commission believes there can no longer be any justifiable doubt about five key points: 1. Dams have made an important and significant contribution to human development, and the benefits derived from them have been considerable. 2. In too many cases an unacceptable and often unnecessary price has been paid to secure those benefits, especially in social and environmental terms, by people displaced, by communities downstream, by taxpayers and by the

natural environment. 3. Lack of equity in the distribution of benefits has called into question the value of many dams in meeting water and energy development needs when compared with the alternatives 4. By bringing to the table all those whose rights are involved and who bear the risks associated with different options for water and energy resources development, the conditions for a positive resolution of competing interests and conflicts are created. 5. Negotiating outcomes will greatly improve the development effectiveness of water and energy projects by eliminating unfavourable projects at an early stage, and by offering as a choice only those options that key stakeholders agree represent the best ones to meet the needs in question. Question 9: Summarise the recommendations of the Commission about how future dam construction should proceed. (Two minute pause) Test 2 -Listening - TAPESCRIPTS Page 54 T e x t for T a s k T h r e e : Radio p r o g r a m m e Fade in ... Host: Dr

Chi: Host: Dr Chi: Host: Dr Chi: Host: Dr Chi: Host: JG: Host: JG: Host: JG: Dr. Chi: Host: Dr. Chi: JG: Dr. Chi: Host: JG: So Dr. Chi youre basically saying that there are fewer than 1000 pandas left in China? Well, yes, sadly that seems to be the case. And in Haidan, where you work, is it also the case that numbers are dropping? There was a survey in the area in 1974 and it showed that numbers there had fallen to an alarmingly low 145 - and it was as a result of the survey that the forest reserve was set up in the first place. But it doesnt seem to have helped much - how big is it? Well its 500,000 acres and... And the numbers kept on dropping? The survey of 1986 showed only about half the earlier number - and we suspect that numbers have dropped even below that level since then. Let me turn to Jane Greenaway from the Environmental Action Centre in the United States. Jane - this is clearly a serious problem. Its simply tragic. Do you think we might be staring at the prospect of

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a world without pandas? Thats a very realistic proposition. So why do you think the numbers are falling? Its very simple - the forest reserve was created - but in fact trees, the natural habitat for the creatures, are disappearing at a faster rate than the reserve is being created. The Haidan forest has dramatically deteriorated since 1975. In fact the tree loss is greater inside the reserve than it is for the forests immediately outside the reserve. The local people indiscriminately chop down the trees. This has to be stopped at once. Sorry but I must interrupt here. Thats such a simplistic diagnosis. What Miss Greenaway is presenting is only a small part of the overall picture. In fact although its the locals that chop down the trees, theyre not the root of the problem. So what is? Quite simply, and bluntly, its people like Jane Greenaway. Thats outrageous. Well-meaning of course, but in their keenness to observe the animals in the wild they are actually contributing to their

downfall. People like Miss Greenaway come in their thousands to stare at the creatures. The official figures say that there were over 30,000 tourists in the park last year. Personally I think the figure is more like five times that. The reserve actively encourages more people to come. And more people means more harm to the local environment in so many ways. Jane? I dont disagree that tourists contribute to the problem - but the key issue is that locals cut down trees. The tourists dont do that. Test 2 -Listening - TAPESCRIPTS Dr. Chi: Host: JG: Host: Dr Chi: Host: JG: Dr Chi: JG: Host: Page 55 Thats a fairly typical simplified view from a western green organisation, the real picture is much more complex. Its not just the visitors themselves, but the industries and services they require. Let me take just one example: smoked pork. Now smoked pork is a regional speciality. But in the past no-one sold it around this area. Tourists come. More stalls want to sell more pork. So more

is produced. Smoking requires fuel for fires. Electricity is expensive. Wood is free - so the trees get cut down. I dont know if you know this, but pandas give birth only once every two years and prefer to raise their cubs inside hollow trees. Logging denies them these sites. Another problem is that cutting gaps in the forest cuts off one segment of the population from another - thus encouraging in-breeding and lowering the birth rate. Do the local population also add to the difficulties at all? Of course they do. I dont know why Dr Chi is so keen to whitewash the locals of any responsibility and blame it all on tourists. The local population increased by over 70 % in twenty years. They compete for resources with the pandas. Its a bit ironic isnt it that they cut down a tree to make a souvenir panda and in doing so help kill off the creature they are celebrating. Is there any way forward? Dr Chi? We have to find a way to provide local people with a way to benefit from tourism that

doesnt destroy the local habitat. Local people need to find a way to earn a living. You cant do conservation in a vacuum. Jane? I think the government has to immediately and firmly institute laws to stop people chopping down trees in a wide area in and around the reserve. You cant just force laws like that on people. Its just not as easy as you ecowarriors like to think. There are people living here who depend on trees. We have to find compromises that take people and their needs into account. With less than 1000 pandas left whos going to carry the cost of that compromise? Thank you, thank you I think well have to leave it there. Weve been listening to Fade ® Dialogue based on article in Newsweek April 16 2001 page 48 "Loving Pandas to death" by Anna Kuchment. Name of people and town changed. Test 3 -Grammar & Vocabulary - ANSWER KEY TEST 3: GRAMMAR & VOCABULARY - Page 56 A N S W E R KEY Candidate N u m b e r : E A Centre Code Candidate Code Task One:

Dictation 1 1. The flightless kiwi, 2. with its hairlike feathers and long, curved beak, 2 3. is so intrinsically woven 4. into New Zealands social fabric 3 5. that its name is almost more brand than bird. 4 6. Two hundred years ago, 7. there were millions of kiwis. 5 8. Today there are 85,000 6 9. and the number is falling 10. at nearly 6 percent a year 7 11. (or halving every decade). 8 12. Half the kiwi eggs laid dont hatch, 9 13. and 95 % of the remainder 14. are eaten by introduced predators Test 3 -Grammar & Vocabulary - ANSWER KEY Page 57 10 15. before they are 6 months old. 11 16. But while the 30 million-year-old bird is endangered, 12 17. New Zealanders have claimed its name for their fruit 13 18. as well as for themselves. 14 19. While the question of why the word kiwi 20. has saturated New Zealands culture 15 2 1 . is likely to get as many answers 22. as there are people, 16 23. the bird has always held special significance 24. for the indigenous

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Maori people. 17 25. Maori see the kiwi 26. as the eldest child of Tane Mahuta, 18 27. the god of the forest. 19 28. A kiwi-feather cloak is frequently worn 29. by Maori of high rank on ceremonial occasions 20 30. such as deaths and marriages. Test 3 -Grammar & Vocabulary - ANSWER KEY Page 58 T a s k T w o : M u l t i p l e C h o i c e G a p Fill - Questions 1-15 Question Your Answer Example 8 1 9 2 10 3 II 4 12 5 13 6 14 7 15 T a s k T h r e e : G a p Fill - Questions 16-30 Example For 23 Do not write here 16 the 24 once / when that 25 17 it even 26 18 only / very / just / quite once / when 27 19 as had 28 20 did / might still 29 21 why as 30 22 through / over / across / throughout never / rarely Test 6 - Mediation Part B - ANSWER KEY Page 59 ANSWER KEY - TEST 4: Mediation Part A Candidate • • • • Number: Give one mark for each distinct piece of information that is present. (Divided by a dash - in the answer key)

If the meaning is clear, the mark is awarded. The use of both third person and first person is acceptable. The meaning may be conveyed using different words from those used in the answer key. Errors of grammar and spelling are not penalised if the meaning is still clear. Ex 1 Ex 2 W r i t e in English W r i t e in Hungarian Example: Please spare me a moment - trying to talk to you for hours Example: természetesen - nagyon sajnálom - először használjuk ezt a szállodát - ahogy ön látja problémák / nehéz helyzet Score max 1 W r i t e in English not surprised you feel uncomfortable - 2. most of our rooms look out on a dark back yard 3. opposite of what brochure says 3 2 W r i t e in Hungarian 4. megértem a csalódottságát - 5. a prospektusban benne van, hogy a (tengerre néző) kilátást nem tudjuk biztosítani 2 3 W r i t e in English 6. doesnt solve our problem - 7. reduction in price 2 4 W r i t e in Hungarian 8. már kapcsolatba léptem a londoni

központunkkal 9. tengerre néző szobákat már kivették - 10. ebben nem sokat segíthetünk 3 5 W r i t e in English 1 1. 1 hope you can do something (soon) -12. Ill get a newspaper to print our story 2 6 W r i t e in Hungarian 13. egy-két nap türelmet kérünk - 14. biztos vagyok benne megoldjuk a problémát 2 Total 14 6 - Mediation Part B - ANSWER KEY Page 60 TAPESCRIPT Dialogue Ex Lenne kedves egy percet szánni rám? Órák óta hiába próbálok beszélni 1 magával. Possible translation Could you possibly spare me a moment? Ive been trying to talk to you for hours. Ex 2 Of course, madam. Im terribly sorry. This is the first time our tour company has used this hotel, and as youve probably noticed, were having some unexpected problems. Természetesen, hölgyem. Szörnyen sajnálom, de az utazási irodánk most először veszi igénybe ezt a szállodát, és ahogy nyilván ön is látja, akad néhány váratlan problémánk. 1 Nem csodálom, hogy

kellemetlenül érzi magát. Legtöbbünk szobája - ellentétben prospektusban olvasottakkal - egy sötét hátsó udvarra néz. No wonder you dont feel very comfortable. Most of us have rooms, which, in spite of what the brochure says, look out on a dark back yard. 2 I understand your disappointment madam, but the brochure does state that we cannot always guarantee rooms with a sea view. Megértem a csalódottságát, hölgyem, de a prospektusban benne van, hogy a tengerre néző kilátást nem tudjuk mindig garantálni. 3 Meglepné, ha azt hallaná, hogy ezzel nem oldotta meg a problémánkat? Legalább valami árengedményt adjanak nekünk. Would you be surprised to hear that it doesnt solve our problem? At least you should give us a reduction in price. 4 I have already contacted our head office in London. However, the rooms with a sea view are already taken, so there is very little I can do about that, Im afraid. Már kapcsolatba léptem a londoni központunkkal.Sajnos

azonban a tengerre néző szobákat már kivették, így nem sokat segíthetünk, attól tartok. 5 Remélem, sikerül elintéznie az ügyet egy-két napon belül. Ha nem, megtalálom a módját, hogy valamelyik újság megírja, hogy jártam magukkal. I hope you can do something about it in the next few days. If not, Ill find a way to publish our case in the newspaper. 6 Please bear with us for a day or two. Im sure we can resolve this situation to everybodys satisfaction. Néhány nap türelmét kérem. Biztos vagyok benne, hogy meg tudjuk oldani ezt a helyzetet mindenki megelégedésére. Test 6 - Mediation Part B - ANSWER KEY Page 61 ANSWER KEY - TEST4: MEDIATION - PART B Candidate N u m b e r : T a s k O n e : English i n t o H u n g a r i a n - A T e x t INSTRUCTIONS TO EXAMINERS Content • Candidates receive one mark for each one of the following pieces of meaning that is clearly expressed. • The information can be present in any order. • Do not mark for

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linguistic accuracy. Mark only for presence of information. • The words here in this table are only a guide to target meanings - NB these exact words are not required. Information Mark 1 ösztönös /reflex-szerű reakció 1 2 ahogy elkezdenek fészkelődni 1 3 vagy b á r m i é r t nyűgösködni kezdenek 4 valami édeset n y o m u n k 1 ragadós kezecskéjükbe 5 cukron vesszük m e g a nyugalmat egy kis időre 1 csöppségekből 6 akiket eleinte elcsitít az édesség 1 7 később szörnyetegek lesznek, 1 8 a m i n t a cukor hatása elmúlik 1 9 a cukor t ö n k r e t e h e t i a gyerek egészségét 1 10 az elfogyasztott cukorból háj lesz 1 a hájból elhízás 1 gyakran maguk a szülők jelentik a nagyobb p r o b l é m á t 1 11 12 13 14 hogy az ételek t e r m é s z e t e s jó íze 1 n e m is élvezhető hozzáadott cukor, édesítés nélkül 1 m e r t a z t gondolják, ez ostobaság Total Continued on next page... 14

Test 4 - Mediation Part A - ANSWER KEY Page 62 SAMPLE ANSWER Légy "fogtündér" Szinte ösztönös a reakciónk. Amint a gyerekek elkezdenek tekeregni a kocsijukban, vagy bármért nyűgösködni kezdenek, ragadós kezecskéjükbe nyomunk valami édeset. Cukron vásároljuk meg egy kis időre a nyugalmunkat. De csöppségekből akiket eleinte elcsitít az édesség, később szörnyetegek esznek , amint a cukor hatása elmúíik. A cukor tönkreteheti a gyerek egészségét. A cukorfogyasztásból háj lesz, a hájból elhízás. Legtöbbször nem is a gyerekek, inkább a szülők jelentik a problémát, mert úgy gondolják, hogy az ételek természetes jó íze nem is élvezhető hozzáadott cukor, édesítés nélkül . Ez ostobaság. Language m a r k i n g c r i t e r i a o f m e d i a t i n g f r o m English t o H u n g a r i a n Mark Criteria 5 Overall Meaning Very occasional confusion of meaning but the overall meaning has been mediated largely successfully. The

writers original intention / point of view has been conveyed very well in the mediated text. The text captures the style of the original well. Source Language Interference Very occasional examples of source language interference that do not interfere with meaning of the text. There is little or no evidence that this is a translation of an English text. The candidate has managed to formulate normal Hungarian sentences that mediate successfully. A positive effect on the reader 4 some elements of 5 & 3 3 Overall Meaning Although there may be some confusion of meaning, the overall meaning has been mediated largely successfully. The writers original intention / point of view has been broadly conveyed in the mediated text Source Language Interference Although there may be some examples of source language interference, they do not interfere with meaning of the text. The text does not read as if it were a translation of an English text; the candidate has managed to formulate normal

Hungarian sentences that mediate successfully. A satisfactory effect on the reader 2 some elements of 3 & 1 1 Overall Meaning Confusion of meaning has led to the overall meaning of the text not being the same as the original. The writers original intention / point of view has not been conveyed satisfactorily. Source Language Interference Frequent examples of source language interference, that occasionally interfere with meaning of the text. The text reads as if it were a translation of an English text. The presence of English sentences using Hungarian words has a negative effect on the reader. Test 6 - Mediation Part B - ANSWER KEY Page 63 ANSWER KEY - TEST4: MEDIATION - PART B T a s k T w o : H u n g a r i a n i n t o English - A L e t t e r Information Mark I am writing to complain about one of your services 1 in your advertisement You run a childrens camp with trained language teachers in pleasant surroundings after we arrived it became clear the wooden houses

intended for accommodation were on a sunburnt field fifteen minutes walk away from the five showers intended to serve a hundred children 1 1 1 1 1 1 the trained teachers were university students who had never taught a language lesson showed very poor child management skills as a consequence the system of registering was rather chaotic 1 1 1 my child is vegetarian we discovered at lunch the kitchen was not prepared for this or any other dietary needs Given the circumstances outlined above 1 1 I brought her home immediately As you are clearly in breach of contract I would like a full refund 1 1 Total 14 SAMPLE ANSWER Dear Sir, I am writing to complain about one of your services. I read in your advertisement, that you run a childrens camp with trained language teachers in pleasant surroundings. After we arrived, it became clear that the wooden houses intended for accommodation were on a sunburnt field, fifteen minutes walk away from the five showers intended to serve a

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hundred children. The trained teachers were university students who had never taught a language lesson in their lives, and showed very poor child management skills. As a consequence the registration was rather chaotic. In addition my child is vegetarian, but we discovered at lunch, that the kitchen was not prepared for this or any other dietary needs. Given the circumstances outlined above I brought her home immediately. As your organization is clearly in breach of contract, I would like a full refund. Yours faithfully, Szíjártó Kálmán Test 6 - Mediation Part B - ANSWER KEY Page 64 TEST 4: M E D I A T I O N - PART B - M A R K I N G SCHEME 2 Language m a r k i n g c r i t e r i a o f m e d i a t i n g f r o m H u n g a r i a n t o English Mark Criteria Range 5 • ideas linked across sentences and paragraphs in a way that the text reads as a seamless whole. • uses polite forms where necessary and can differentiate well between different levels of formality (e.g. very

polite for a difficult request). Can convey a number of attitudes in one (e.g. polite but firm) Accuracy Occasional minor errors (slips) that do not obscure meaning. Source Language interference Occasional minor examples of source language interference may be evident but they do not obscure meaning. 4 some elements of 5 & 3 Range • • • 3 adequate to complete the task ideas linked across sentences and paragraphs (cohesive devices/adverbials to express reasons, opinions, feelings etc.) in a way that the text reads as a whole. uses polite forms where necessary and can differentiate reasonably between different levels of formality (e.g. very polite for a difficult request) Accuracy Some minor errors (slips) that rarely obscure meaning. Source Language interference Some minor examples of source language interference (choice of word /phrase, word order) may be evident but they do not usually obscure meaning. 2 some elements of 3 & 1 Range • inadequate to complete the

task • ideas sometimes linked across sentences and paragraphs although not with the most appropriate choice of language. • 1 some polite forms used Accuracy • errors sometimes obscure meaning occasionally significantly. • errors have a negative affect on the target reader Source Language Interference Source language interference sometimes obscures meaning, occasionally significantly.