Betekintés: Faculty handbook

Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

AMERICAN ENGLISH INSTITUTE
FACULTY HANDBOOK

FALL 2011

Also available electronically on Blackboard



American English Institute
University of Oregon
Mission Statement
The mission of the American English Institute encompasses leadership in English language teaching,
research, and service on the University of Oregon campus and around the world. The AEI is committed to
the following:











Effectively preparing students with the linguistic, critical thinking and intercultural communication
skills needed for successful academic careers, resulting in high rates of UO’s retention and
graduation of international students
Supporting international students’ language needs at all levels of their UO study and motivating
students toward autonomy in lifelong learning

Creating a learning environment for students that is both personally and academically engaging
Contributing to international and intercultural awareness and diversifying UO’s campus by
attracting and integrating a large, multicultural student population

Enhancing, via its teacher training programs, the abilities of current and future language teaching
professionals to deliver quality language education

Inspiring and supporting its faculty to contribute to the field of English language education through
research, innovation, collaboration, entrepreneurship and leadership
Collaborating with the UO campus community to create a network of language learning programs,
student support, and research initiatives

Cultivating a global network of strong connections with high-quality institutions worldwide

Maintaining its status as a self-supporting unit of the UO without sacrificing its commitment to
affordable academic excellence
The American English Institute at the UO is accredited by the Commission on
English Language Program Accreditation (CEA), and agrees to uphold the
commission’s standards for English language programs and institutions. The
institute is also a member of the University Consortium of Intensive English
Programs (UCIEP) and the American Association of Intensive English
Programs (AAIEP).
This handbook is updated each fall term.

2



TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction

4

Organizational Chart

5

Current AEI Administrative & Staff Positions

6

AEI Program Descriptions

7

Executive Committee Position Descriptions

10

Administrative Position Descriptions, Faculty

13

Instructor Positions and Responsibilities

16

New Instructor Procedures

16

Faculty Annual Review and Promotion

24

Placement and Evaluation

26

Curriculum

32

Resources, Facilities, and Equipment

35

Policies and Procedures

38

Faculty Materials Policy

47

Technology Tips and Policies

48

Appendix 1. AEI Faculty Review Policy

51

Appendix 2. Criteria for Promotion

64

3



AMERICAN ENGLISH INSTITUTE
FACULTY ORIENTATION HANDBOOK
Introduction
This handbook has been put together to acquaint new teaching staff with the organization, mechanics,
procedures and policies of the American English Institute (AEI). It is also intended as a reference for the
entire staff. Specific questions not covered in the handbook should be referred to the appropriate
administrative personnel.

History
The American English Institute was begun by Dale Sloat, Chair of the Linguistics Department, in March 1978
under the Department of Continuing Education. It was first operated out of the Linguistics Department offices,
PLC 241, with a staff of one teacher (Sarah Klinghammer), two GTFs (Terry West and Deanna Hochstein) and a
secretary. To accommodate rapid growth, the AEI had to be moved, first to the current Office of International
Programs in Oregon Hall and then off campus to a medical clinic building on 11th Street.
Since Dr. Sloat’s tenure, the AEI has operated under the direction of Iris Moye (acting director, 1980-82),
Noel Schutz (1982), Russ Tomlin (1983-1988), Hartmut Burmeister (1988-90), Peggy Dame (acting
director, 1990-91), Jacquelyn Schachter (1991-94), Sarah Klinghammer (1994-2000), Deanna Hochstein
(interim director, 2000-02), and Christa Hansen (2002-2005). From the summer of 2005 to the spring of
2010, the AEI operated under the direction of Cindy Kieffer, Director of Academic Programs and Research,
and Peggy Dame, Director of Program Development and International Outreach. In Spring 2010, Cindy
Kieffer assumed the newly unified position of AEI Director.
Under Dr. Tomlins direction, the AEI became an academic unit within the Linguistics Department. In
2005-6, AEI and Linguistics faculty jointly reviewed AEI’s relationship to the Linguistics Department,
College of Arts and Sciences, and the University of Oregon. AEI’s place as an academic unit within the
Linguistics Department was reaffirmed at that time.

Also under Dr. Tomlin’s direction, the AEI started the Supplementary English Language Training (SELT)
program for matriculated students. Dr. Tomlin subsequently received a large donation intended for an AEI
language lab. He convinced the donor to expand the donation for a university language-learning center,
which became the Yamada Language Center (YLC) in 1990. In exchange, the AEI received its present space
in Pacific Hall, adjacent to the YLC. In 1998, SELT became the Academic English for International Students
program (AEIS) and began offering its courses for university credit.
As a result of a Fall 2007 UO Admissions/AEI decision to offer conditional admission to international
undergraduate applicants who qualify academically, there has been a significant ongoing increase in
student enrollment in all programs. In addition, enrollment in Distance Education courses has grown
rapidly under the direction of Leslie Opp-Beckman. These increases triggered the most recent
administrative reorganization.

In spring 2010, an executive committee was formed which comprises five standing members of the AEI
faculty: Director, Instructional Coordinator, Special Programs Coordinator, Distance Education
Coordinator, and Marketing Coordinator. Ad hoc members are invited depending on topics of discussion.
The Linguistics Department Head and the Assistant Director for Budgets and Operations also attends
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


meetings when the agenda makes this useful. The Executive Committee responsibilities include
establishing long- and short-term goals for the AEI, making decisions regarding the allocation of resources,
and monitoring progress towards and ensuring completion of set goals and strategies. The Executive
Committee is a decision-making committee which strives for consensus, but ultimate authority lies with the
Linguistics Department Head. This is the current administrative status of the institute.

4



CURRENT AEI ADMINISTRATIVE AND STAFF POSITIONS
Director

Cindy Kieffer

Executive Committee
Linguistics Department Head
Director
Associate Director
Special Programs Director
Distance Education Director
Marketing and Alumni Relations Director

Eric Pederson
Cindy Kieffer
Alison Evans
Jill Cargile
Leslie Opp-Beckman
TBD

Administrative Positions, Faculty
Head Academic Adviser
Academic Adviser
Tutor Coordinator
IGTF Coordinator
New Instructor/GTF Supervisor

Pat Bryan
Maiko Hata
Sydney Kinnaman
Kelly Yerian
Laura Holland

Administrative and Classified Positions
Assistant Director of Finance
Fiscal Coordinator 1
Accounting Technician
Office Manager (AEI)
Faculty Services Coordinator
Receptionist/Clerical Support
Admissions Coordinator
Admissions Assistant
Student Services Coordinator
Assistant Student Services Coordinator
AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator
Assistant to the Associate Director
Marketing and Alumni Relations Director
Homestay Coordinator

TBD
Marsha Graveson
Jacque Albert
Dennis Bonner
Gloria Goytia
Paul Keats
Martine Wigham
Krista Farris
Josie Mulkins
TBD
Lucy McWhorter
Arnita Albertson
TBD

Jayne Palmer

6



AEI PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
Intensive English Program
The Intensive English Program consists of seven levels of intensive English instruction for nonmatriculated students of English as a second language. Students at all levels attend classes 18 hours per
week in Reading/Writing/Grammar (12 hours) and Oral Skills (6 hours) classes. Upper-level students have
the option of taking up to two elective classes which meet for two hours per week. Enrollment in elective
classes may raise the total number of hours enrolled to as many as 22 hours per week.

After their first term of study, students without a score over 500 on the paper-based TOEFL, 61 on the
internet-based TOEFL, or 6 on the IELTS may take a university class through the Community Education
Program (CEP). Students at lower levels have an opportunity to take a course in math, computers, music or
foreign language. Students wishing to take a CEP course must receive permission from an academic
adviser.
IEP curriculum is coordinated by the faculty, who are responsible for regularly reviewing curriculum and
assessment, deciding on textbooks, maintaining materials files, and planning program change and
development.
Academic English for International Students Program

The Academic English for International Students (AEIS) program was started in Fall 1987 (known as SELT
until 1998) as a result of recommendations made after three years of study by an ad hoc committee (Paul
Holbo, Russ Tomlin and Tom Mills) formed to review university policies, program, and procedures for
international students.

The program curriculum consists of a series of English for Academic Purposes courses for matriculated
international students, graduate and undergraduate, with a score under 575 on the paper-based TOEFL, 88
on the internet-based TOEFL, or 7 on IELTS. Included in the curriculum are writing courses (AEIS 110, 111,
112), courses in academic oral communication (AEIS 101 and 102), reading courses (AEIS 107, 108). All
100-level courses for undergraduates receive University of Oregon elective credits (4).

The AEIS program is responsible for initial language proficiency testing of all incoming foreign students
with a score under 575 on the paper-based TOEFL, 88 on the internet-based TOEFL, or 7 on IELTS. This
includes standardized reading, writing, and listening tests.
IGTF Program

The IGTF program consists of two courses offered to international graduate teaching fellows (IGTFs) that
wish to become classroom teachers at the University of Oregon. The IGTF Oral Skills course is for students
with SPEAK scores from 35-40. It focuses on oral English skills and communication strategies. The IGTF
English for Classroom Communication course is for students with a SPEAK score of 45 and focuses on
pronunciation and English language skills needed for classroom teaching and academic interactions. An
IGTF pronunciation course is also offered when there is sufficient demand. As a service to the university,
the AEI also administers and scores the SPEAK test for IGTFs or potential IGTFs. This test evaluates oral
proficiency and determines need for possible placement into the IGTF program.

7



Special Programs
Special programs are sponsored contract programs that are tailored to the needs of a specific group. The
majority of these programs take place during the summer, but they may occur at any time throughout the
academic year. These may range from general language/culture programs to teacher training programs,
specific cultural orientation/language programs, or English-for-specific-purposes programs. Many special
programs have a pre-arrival/post-session online component.
Distance Education
The American English Institute also offers state-of-the-art online distance education for English language
teaching and learning. Courses and workshops are designed and taught to suit specific groups needs. In
some cases, an instructor may conduct part of the development and/or instruction on site away from
Eugene. In other cases, students may complete part of their instruction on the UO campus. Some example
topic areas are:

• General English Studies, beginning through advanced levels.
• Teacher Training: Building Teaching Skills Through the Interactive Web, Content-Based Instruction,
Process Writing, Reading to Develop Fluency, Project-Based Learning, English for Specific Purposes,
Critical Thinking in the EFL Curriculum, Learning Styles and Strategies, Special Education in TEFL,
Shaping the Way We Teach English (methods course).
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


• Cross-Cultural Communication and Studies.

PROGRAM SERVICES
The AEI offers specific services to the students enrolled in its various programs.

Tutoring

Every student in good standing in the AEI Intensive English Program is allowed two hours of tutoring and
conversation practice per week (at no extra charge) with trained university student tutors. Material in the
student packet explains this program in more detail. Tutors are assigned to students by the third week of
each quarter. Intensive English Program instructors are encouraged to make suggestions to a students
tutor about work that would benefit the student. For a moderate fee, this program also offers tutoring to
AEIS and IGTF students as well as to other matriculated international students at the university; IEP
students may also purchase additional tutoring hours in the same way.
IEP Academic Advising

Services covered by this office include student placement, attendance and performance information, adding
and dropping classes, student problems, problem students, instructor/student complaints, CEP classes,
advice about academic careers and academic transfers, sponsorship reports and letters, and academic
letters of recommendation.

N.B. The Academic Adviser writes all letters of recommendation for IEP students. Instructors are requested not
to do this if asked by their students, but to refer the students to the Academic Adviser. (AEIS instructors write
their own letters of recommendation for their students.)

8



Homest ay
The AEI administers a homestay program for IEP or Special Programs students who are interested in living
with a family. Host families are selected and trained and then matched with students requesting a
homestay living situation. The student pays the family for their room and board. The homestay
coordinator investigates host family /student complaints and problems and tries to resolve them.
Computer L ab

The Yamada computer lab (Pacific 113) serves all language departments at the university and is used by
both the IEP and AEIS programs. The AEI has 15 hours of guaranteed class time in the lab. AEI programs
also use other campus computer labs when necessary.
Airport pick-up

The AEI provides free airport pick-up for new IEP students upon their initial arrival at the Eugene airport,
if given prior notification.
Activities

Both the Intensive English Program and Special Programs offer group activities for students. Services
include orientation activities, athletic activities, special events in town, and out-of-town trips. The Intensive
English Program offers at least one day trip for students each term. University students are used to
coordinate activities for all programs, and they are supervised by the Student Services Coordinator. All
students must sign an activity waiver prior to participation. Students must sign a photo waiver before their
photo is used in AEI promotions. Feedback on student activities is collected and reviewed on an annual
basis in spring term via meetings with students in all sections of Oral Skills 6. This feedback is then
reviewed by a committee including the AEI director, academic advisers, instructional coordinator,
admissions coordinator and student services coordinator. This group makes recommendations for
program changes based on student input.

9



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE POSITION DESCRIPTIONS
Director
FTE:
1.0
Rank:
Unclassified Position
Appointment Period: 3 years
Duties and Responsibilities:

1. Reports to Department Head of Linguistics Department.
2. Is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the AEI: finances, planning, programs, coordinators, faculty,
and recruiting.
3. Working with Marketing Coordinator and office staff to monitor student enrollments, oversees student
recruitment efforts and create enrollment projections. Is responsible for long-range programmatic
planning for the institute, enrollment projections and management, resource identification and
resources to cover operational costs. Requires comprehensive analysis of retention rates, no-show
rates, and other measures of enrollment projection.
4. In coordination with the executive committee, determines budgetary priorities based on the needs of
the various programs.
5. Develops, implements, coordinates and revises policies, procedures, and programs in consultation with
coordinators and executive committee.
6. Supervises AEI Office/Budget Manager.
7. Is responsible for the AEI office with the Office/Budget Manager overseeing the day-to-day operations.
8. Selects, evaluates and supervises faculty and staff in consultation with program coordinators and
office/budget manager.
9. Works with Linguistics department head on campus and community relations.
10. Actively participates in and encourages faculty toward professional development in local, state, and
national ESL and international education organizations.
11. Supervises and maintains AEI student and faculty records.
12. Is responsible for faculty recruiting, meeting with search committee chair, complying with Affirmative
Action and University regulations and procedures, negotiations, and making offers to selected
candidates. Works with Linguistics department head regarding GTF hires and LTS faculty needs.
13. Forecasts, monitors, and reconciles academic salaries and expenses related to instruction.
14. Is responsible for overseeing annual reviews of faculty, hiring, promotion and termination of faculty,
constituting hiring and review committees. Directs budget manager to prepare appointment contracts,
FTE adjustments, etc.
15. Is responsible for maintaining CEA, AAIEP, and UCIEP accreditation.
16. Oversees and approves travel.
17. Is responsible for overseeing MOUs, contracts, and grants.
18. Participates in teaching as administrative duties allow.
19. Is a member of executive committee with voting privileges.
Associate Director
Initial FTE:
1.0
Rank:
Unclassified Position
Appointment Period: 3 years
Duties and Responsibilities:

10



1.
2.
3.
4.

5.
6.

7.
8.

9.

10.
11.
12.

Reports to Director.
Proposes faculty assignments to Director for all programs.
Works on faculty sharing and integration with Directors of Special Programs and Distance Education.
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


Is responsible for class and room scheduling. Works with the Assistant to the Associate Director to
develop schedule and obtain classrooms.
Constitutes curriculum committees to ensure curriculum is consistent with the mission of the American
English Institute, appropriate to achieve the organization’s goals and meet assessed student needs, and
available in writing.
Is responsible for curriculum submission to CAS for credit bearing courses as needed, and preparing
curriculum packet for Linguistics department head for approval.
Coordinates testing and placement activities.
Makes final determination of textbooks with input from instructors. Informs Assistant to the Associate
Director to order textbooks.
Directs Student Services Coordinator to organize orientation week activities, and AEIS/IEP Services
Coordinator to facilitate class registration.
Works with Academic Advisers (IEP, OIA).
Supervises the Assistant to the Associate Director and the AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator.
Is a member of executive committee with voting privileges.

Special Programs Director
FTE:
1.0
Rank:
Unclassified Position
Appointment Period: 3 years
Duties and Responsibilities:

1. Reports to Director.
2. Works with executive committee to determine long- and short-range goals, evaluate number of
attendees and value of programs.
3. Serves as contact with universities, governments and clients to locate, evaluate and recommend
creation of new programs.
4. Writes grants, works with Director on contracts and recommends MOUs to Director.
5. Determines and identifies instructors for programs with input from Instructional Coordinator.
6. Works with budget manager for contracts and financial needs.
7. Works with budget manager to create, review and evaluate budget.
8. Works with Student Services Coordinator to determine and organize orientations, graduations for new
groups, activities, and day-to-day operational needs of students.
9. Supervises student assistant and works with Student Services Coordinator.
10. Determines, evaluates and writes final reports for each program.
11. Provides input to Marketing Coordinator to develop a website for special programs, advertising and
recruitment.
12. Prepares quarterly reports for Executive Committee on all activities and budgets.
13. Participates in teaching as administrative duties allow.
14. Meets with visitors from all special programs and those interested in possible programs.
15. Is a member of executive committee with voting privileges.
Distance Education Director
FTE:
1.0
Rank:
Unclassified
Appointment Period: 3 years

11



Duties and Responsibilities:
1. Reports to Director.
2. Does continuous fund raising; writes grants, works with Director on contracts and recommends MOUs
to Director.
3. Develops, coordinates, and administers distance education projects and programs including needs
analysis, mentoring and training of AEI faculty, program content and delivery, evaluation.
4. Participates in teaching and course development.
5. Researches distance education trends and make recommendations to the director.
6. Is responsible for budget for each program.
7. Serves as contact for all distance education related projects.
8. Coordinates and delivers in-house tech-related professional development and mentoring for
instructors.
9. Works with executive committee to determine long- and short-range goals, evaluates number of
attendees and value of programs.
10. Determines and identifies instructors for programs with input from Associate Director.
11. Works with budget manager for contracts and financial needs.
12. Works with budget manager to create, review and evaluate budget.
13. Determines, evaluates and writes final reports for each program.
14. Works with Director of Marketing and Alumni Relations for attending conferences and trips for
recruiting students.
15. Prepare quarterly reports for executive committee on all activities and budget.
16. Is a member of executive committee with voting privileges.
Marketing and Alumni Relations Direct or
Initial FTE:
1.0 Summer 2011
Rank:
Unclassified Position
Appointment Period: 3 years
Duties and Responsibilities:

1. Reports to Director.
2. Identifies marketing trends and present findings to Executive Committee to determine long- and
short term goals for recruitment. Creates annual report.
3. Develops a marketing and recruiting plan to support long and short-term goals identified by the
Executive Committee.
4. Is responsible for design and maintenance of websites for advertisement, information and
recruitment for all AEI programs.
5. Supervises website development. Solicits input from coordinators for website needs. Works with
designated office staff member and IT person for website updates and maintenance.
6. Identifies and evaluates effectiveness of website, recruiting agents, and paid sites.
7. Manages annual recruiting budget.
8. Coordinates all recruiting efforts, including utilizing faculty traveling for business purposes for IEP,
special programs, and distance education.
9. Is responsible for working with agents.
10. Develops and prints recruiting materials (brochures, handouts, advertisement.)
11. Works with Director in coordination with Office of International Affairs and other University units
in international outreach and recruiting.
12. Is a member of executive committee with voting privileges.

12



ADMINISTRATIVE POSITION DESCRIPTIONS, FACULTY
Academic Advisers
The academic advisers primarily serve the Intensive English Program. They consult regularly with the
Admissions Coordinator, and as needed with the Associate Director/Director, to get input/advice on
management of challenging situations, but in most situations the final decision rests with the academic
advisers, as does responsibility for the consequences of the decision.
Duties and responsibilities:

1. Oversees development and implementation of IP academic policies regarding grading and
evaluation of student work, academic honesty, attendance, performance, CEP courses, academic
probation and dismissal, and withdrawal.
2. Participates in quarterly review of factors affecting IP recruitment and retention.
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


3. With Associate Director, places new students in levels, based on placement test results.
4. Creates class sections balanced for student status, nationality and gender, and monitors class size
during first week of term. Consults with instructors and/or students as necessary regarding level
placement.
5. Consults with instructors and/or students as necessary regarding attendance and performance
difficulties, academic misconduct, classroom behavior problems, student/teacher conflicts,
student/student conflicts, personal concerns and students with special needs.
6. Advises students about U.S. undergraduate and graduate programs; helps students create realistic
academic goals; informs students of general SEVIS requirements as needed; advises students
wishing to take CEP classes at UO and completes necessary paperwork.
7. Advises students of campus and community resources as needed (drivers license, social security
numbers, volunteer and work opportunities, child-care, etc.)
8. Advises students with personal problems, including referral to Counseling Center, Legal Services
and other campus offices as needed. Help students arrange appointments and accompany students
to appointments if appropriate.
9. Writes letters of recommendation and progress reports, performs exit interviews for students
transferring to other IEPs, and handles all correspondence regarding students academic status and
progress with sponsors and others, soliciting input from instructors when necessary.
10. Serves as contact person for International Affairs, Admissions, Counseling Center, Health Center,
Housing, Student Conduct, Legal Services, Disability Services and other campus offices and
academic departments, regarding individual student situations and/or IP student issues; serve on
UO committees which deal with issues pertinent to IP students.
11. Accommodates requests for classroom observations, research volunteers and final project needs
from students in Linguistics Department classes. Disseminates information to students from
various student organizations upon request.
12. Notifies students of opportunities and events offered by various student organizations and offices
via e-mail. Also sends periodic informational emails on topics of general interest to international
students.
13. Arranges UO information meetings with Admissions and International Affairs personnel on request.
14. Arranges and facilitates Student Advisory Council meeting in spring term.
15. Updates faculty and student handbooks on a yearly basis with Associate Director/Director.

13



Tutor Coordinat or
The tutor coordinator serves all AEI programs and the larger university community. The tutor coordinator
maintains, recruits, hires, trains, supervises, and evaluates tutors for students in the AEI’s Intensive English
Program and Special Programs. The Tutor Coordinator organizes and oversees placements of tutors with
individual AEI students, in the AEI Oral Skills classes and Special Programs small groups and classes.
Duties and responsibilities:

Recruiting and hiring.
1. Maintains Career Center job postings.
2. Maintains database of inquiries.
3. Interviews and trains new tutors each term to maintain a tutoring staff of approximately 115
tutors.
4. Verifies that new tutors meet UO eligibility to work requirements.
5. Prepares hiring documents to submit to payroll.
6. Orients new tutors on policies, procedures.
7. Trains tutors in second language learning, cross-cultural communication and teaching
techniques.
Areas of decision-making.
1. Sets and oversees policies for students and tutors to optimize student learning.
2. Assigns extra tutoring when requested and if merited.
3. Manages and oversees placement and use of tutors in classrooms.
4. Determines wages and pay increases.
5. Processes terminations of tutors for poor performance.
6. Sets and oversees procedures to manage tutor-related workflow throughout the institute.
Tutor coordinating and supervisory responsibilities.
1. Places tutors and students.
2. Manages complaints and counsel both students and tutors.
3. Maintains a database of placements and tutor information.
4. Makes specific lists of tutor placements for teachers.
5. Makes sure payroll deadlines are met.
6. Checks and approves time sheets.
7. Advises and disciplines tutors as needed.
8. Keeps track of inquiries for tutor jobs.
9. Assists tutors and students who have trouble making contact.
10. Orients new and returning students to the tutor program.
11. Organizes and reviews student and instructor evaluations of tutors and gives feedback.
12. Updates and maintains proper information on all forms related to the tutor program.
13. Orients AEI instructors on how to make use of tutors in their classes.
14. Meets with individual instructors to discuss specific student needs.
15. Writes letters of reference for tutors.
16. Meets with individual tutors for specialized training.
17. Places, trains and oversees tutors assigned to UO international faculty and students who need
language support.
18. Develops materials for tutor training.
19. Provides specialized materials for tutors to use with their students.
20. Meets regularly with the AEI Office Manager, Instructional Coordinator and Director regarding
the use of tutors in AEI programs.
21. Works with Special Programs Coordinator to provide specialized and general tutoring for
individual groups.

14



Budget management.
1. Manages tutor program to function efficiently and cost-effectively.
2. Oversees payroll paperwork and procedures to ensure that tutors record working hours under
correct budget indexes.
IGTF C oordinat or
Responsibilities of the IGTF coordinator are to supervise SPEAK testing, advise students on the results of
their SPEAK tests and possible course work, coordinate the curriculum in the two IGTF courses, and
communicate with academic departments and the Graduate School regarding testing and other IGTF
concerns.
GTF Supervisor
The GTF Supervisor’s goal is to help new GTFs to get organized and oriented as quickly as possible so that
when they begin teaching their courses they have already begun to process some of the myriad
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


organizational threads of their new job. By establishing routines early on and maintaining an open line of
communication, the GTF Supervisor seeks to address concerns and difficulties proactively and/or as early
as possible. The roles of this position comprise a blend of supervisory and advisery responsibilities,
including acting as a mentor and an advocate.
Duties and responsibilities:

1. Establish contact as early as possible with each GTF, introducing her/himself, her/his role and
giving all contact info.
2. Organize and give mini workshop during week 0 for all new GTFs on procedures such as giving
directions, proper tone/register to use with Ss, groupings, and other techniques for providing
comprehensible input for Ss as well as basic classroom management techniques.
3. Meet at least once during orientation week to answer questions and go over all procedural
items necessary for getting set up in AEI.
4. Be available during Week 0 to field individual questions and give any advice and
encouragement necessary.
5. Be available throughout the term to field any questions or concerns that are not addressed by
the lead teacher they are working with.
6. Hold GTF meetings/workshops as necessary to address concerns as they arise, as well as reflect
as a group on professional standards.
7. Observe each new GTF teaching once between weeks 3-5 in order to get a feel for how they are
doing. These formative observations may be 30+ minutes and will be handled using a similar
format as with new adjunct observations: brief pre- and post-observation meetings.
8. Meet midterm with group and address any questions/concerns.
9. Communicate periodically with lead teachers for any concerns regarding individual GTF on
their teams
10. Observe GTFs teaching, weeks 6-9, as possible.
11. Act as point person to help guide GTFs to resources as needed.
Act as adviser/mentor/mediator as needed.

Student Positions

Student employees also fill the following positions: Front desk office assistants, Activities coordinators

15



and Tutors

INSTRUCTOR POSITIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Instructors with Disabilities
The University of Oregon is dedicated to the principles of equal opportunity in education and an acceptance
of diversity as an affirmation of individual identity within a welcoming community. Disability is recognized
as an aspect of diversity, integral to the university and to society. Instructors with disabilities should
contact the office of Affirmative Action for accommodation of the disability.
New Instructor Procedures – ALL Programs
All new adjunct faculty are considered to be on a probationary period during the first two terms of hire.

Faculty Mentors
New instructors are paired with a faculty mentor who advises and assists them in acclimating to working at
the AEI and living in a new city.
Payroll
New instructors should see the Office Manager as soon as possible to fill out the necessary forms to get on
the payroll. They should be aware that the first check might be late due to the complexity of the university
system.

Offices
Each new instructor is assigned an office by the Director.

Keys
Each instructor should have a key to his/her office, and a key to the main office (which will also open
Pacific 6, 105, and 106. It is also possible to get a key to the building in which the faculty members office is
located. To get keys, ask the Faculty Services Coordinator for a key request form. The form must be taken to
the campus security office to get the keys. There is a $5 refundable deposit for each key, and a $10 fee for
exterior keys. The UO levies a large fine for lost keys.
Parking
Authorization forms are available from the Faculty Services Coordinator. The completed form must then be
taken to campus security to get a parking permit. Be aware that on-campus parking is both costly and
scarce.
Faculty ID Card
Each instructor must have a faculty ID card. See the Faculty Services Coordinator for a faculty ID
authorization form. Employees working at least .50 FTE will receive approval for a free LTD bus pass.

E-mail
All instructors need to get an e-mail address. This is also considered your DUCKID. Most communication at
the AEI takes place via e-mail through aeinews@lists.uoregon.edu. Most course documents are available on
the AEI Network. If you are new to university, you will need to set up your email address. It is important to
note that at the University you have at least two "usernames":
1. Duck ID

16



Your Duck ID is the part of your UO email that comes before the "@uoregon.edu" (example:
username@uoregon.edu). If you dont have an UO email account, it is likely that you still
need to claim your Duck ID. Your Duck ID is for general use; it is used for logging into
Blackboard, UOnet (wireless internet), e-mail, VPN and nearly everything other than
Duckweb.

2. UO ID Number
Your UO ID Number is used for Duckweb and is separate from your Duck ID.

Claiming Your Duck ID (and email address)
If you are new to the university you can claim your account by visiting duckid.uoregon.edu. Enter your UO
ID number and PAC to log in the first time. Your PAC will be enclosed with the first contract you receive
from the University. If you have not yet received your singed contract with your PAC number, you will first
need to get your faculty ID and then go to the Computing Center to see Connie French in 150D McKenzie
Hall to establish an email address and password. Once this is done, the office manager arranges Network
access, and the instructor receives an email with the Network server access password. The Faculty Mentor
can explain how to use the Network.
Telephone
Each office has at least one phone with its own extension and an automated message system. The main
office can also forward any calls that come to the main office number. There should be instructions in each
office that explain the system. New instructors need to check to see that their message system is updated
with their names.

General Description of Instructor Positions
There are five major categories for non-tenured teaching faculty (NTTF) positions at the AEI:
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!



NTTF Career Track – Senior Instructor.
Senior instructors have successfully completed the university review procedure for senior instructor. They
have a reduced teaching load in IEP (12-15 hrs) or a standard load in AEIS (12 hrs.). They are expected to
provide the versatility and leadership that are required for effective operation of a language program in the
areas of administration, university academic activities, and other services to the AEI in addition to teaching.
They are also expected to pursue professional development activities that enhance operational efficiency,
instructional quality and the national and international reputation of the program. These instructors have
two-year C-3 contracts.

NTTF Career Track – Instructor.
These instructors have been hired through nationwide searches and have met the qualifications of an
academic ESL professional. They have a reduced teaching load in IEP (12-15 hrs) or a standard load in AEIS
(12 hrs). They are expected to take on administrative duties or provide other services to the AEI in addition
to teaching. They are also expected to pursue academic and professional development activities outside
regular teaching. These instructors have one-year contracts. Years 1 to 3 are a C1 contract and years 4 to 6
are a C2 contract.

NTTF Adjunct faculty.
Adjunct instructors have been hired through local or regional position announcements. A full teaching load
(1.0 FTE) in the IEP is 18 contact hours; in AEIS it is 12 contact hours. Adjunct faculty are not required to
pursue extensive academic activities outside their regular teaching load, but are expected to show some
evidence of an active interest in the profession. These instructors have single term D contracts.

17



Retired faculty.
AEI faculty who retire can continue to work at the AEI post-retirement at the director’s discretion on a
term-by-term basis. State/university policy limits instructors to working a maximum 1039 hours per
calendar year post-retirement without losing their pension. Currently, there is no limit on the number of
years instructors can work post-retirement.

Graduate Teaching Fellows (GTF).
GTFs are Linguistics Department students working on either Masters or PhD degrees. Preference in
assigning these GTFs is given to students with ESL/EFL teaching experience, and occasionally qualified
GTF’s from other departments are hired. These positions are usually awarded at a FTE of .4-.49.
University Policies Regarding Instructor Status (Career-track versus Adjunct)
Career NTTF appointments:

• Career NTTF appointments require a national search: local or regional searches will not be used to
appoint career NTTF.
• Career NTTF appointments will be eligible for all regular faculty salary increases and will be included
among those faculty whose salaries and compensation are addressed by the Senate White Paper of
2000.
• Career NTTF are eligible to participate in University governance in accordance with University
Senate legislation; currently, this includes only officers of instruction employed at .50 FTE or
greater who are determined by their academic unit (relevant CAS division or professional
school/college) as eligible for the purpose of voting in University elections and serving on elected
University Committees and/or the University Senate.
• Under most circumstances, career NTTF will be offered contracts of at least one year in duration.
• Career NTTF appointments will be structured to be renewable based on excellence in performance
and available funding but without the need for a new search.
• Career NTTF appointments are eligible for timely notice after a period of probationary service (three
years of service at FTE ? .50 – FTE still to be determined by Academic Affairs). During the first three
years of appointment, a career NTTF appointment is considered a probationary appointment and
the C-contract will not yet include provision of timely notice. At contract renewal at the beginning
of the fourth year of service (the 10th term of service at .50 FTE or greater), the career NTTF will
become eligible for timely notice, following provisions for timely notice included in the UO Faculty
Handbook. See http://academicaffairs.uoregon.edu/handbook/Chapter03.html.
• While it is not always a requirement on departments, academic departments appointing career NTTF
are encouraged to inform individuals with as much advance notice as possible if circumstances
make impossible the continuation of an appointment.
• Career NTTF appointments are distinguished from other academic appointment through the use of a
specific contract type: C- contracts. Only career NTTF will hold C contracts inclusive of those on
funding contingent contracts and those that do not carry timely notice.
• Career NTTF appointments will be eligible for promotion as described below.

Career NTTF contract types:

C1 Contract
• Covers years one through three
• Cannot be made for more than one year at a time
• Does not carry timely notice
• Does not carry eligibility for sabbatical leave

18



C2 – After a favorable departmental review at the end of the third year, a C2 contract:
• Covers years four through six
• Cannot be made for more than one year at a time
• Carries timely notice
• Does not carry eligibility for sabbatical leave

C3 – After l8 academic terms of .5 FTE or greater, instructor is required to apply for promotion to Senior
Instructor. If promoted, the instructor will receive a C3 contract, which:
• Is issued for up to two years at a time
• Carries timely notice, and
• Carries eligibility for sabbatical leave

Adjunct NTTF appointments:
In some cases, there is a need for temporary academic appointments either to deal with short-term
fluctuations in enrollments, for research appointments that are not expected to exceed three years, or to
bring in special expertise from the professional world. Some appointments are made to handle unexpected
enrollment increases (for example, enrollment increases in the IEP) or as a replacement for a course
(replacing the teaching of a faculty member on leave for one term). Such appointments are temporary in
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


nature, and there is generally no intent or plan for such appointments to be renewed. However, when
increased student enrollment in AEI programs warrants additional faculty, adjunct appointments will be
made.
• Adjunct NTTF appointments do not require a national search.
• Adjunct NTTF appointments are not eligible for promotion.
• Adjunct NTTF appointments are renewable for up to three years, if so indicated during the search
process, after which a new search is required (exceptions may be granted for those who hold
annual FTE < .50).
• Adjunct NTTF appointments are not eligible for the regular faculty salary increase process, rather
departments and programs will determine salary or a per course wage.
• Adjunct NTTF appointments are not eligible to participate in University governance.
• Adjunct NTTF appointments are not eligible for timely notice.
• Adjunct NTTF appointments will include the modifier “Adjunct” in the title of the person holding the
appointment.
• Adjunct appointments will be distinguished from other academic appointments through the use of a
specific contract type: D or E contracts. Only adjunct appointments will hold D or E contracts.

INSTRUCTOR RESPONSIBILITIES, Intensive English Program
Contract time frames
Both adjunct and career NTTF instructors are expected to be on site or available for duty from the first day
of new student orientation week until the Friday following the last day of IEP classes. Instructors should be
accessible to the Director by email or phone for consultation during non-teaching weeks. When this is not
possible the Director must be notified in advance.
Lead Instructor Responsibilities

Whenever possible, lead teachers will be adjunct or career-track instructors who have taught the same
course and level before.

19


















Oversee the team.
Balance the workload among instructors on the team.
Organize systems of communication among teachers:
Schedule and facilitate team meetings weekly
Provide a course template on Blackboard
Maintain and organize materials on the server
Clearly specify the skeleton/outline/overall plan of the course by Week 0.
Provide the course description template that includes required information as stipulated in the
Faculty Handbook.
Understand course goals and objectives in relation to the larger curriculum and articulate them to
the team.
Ensure courses at the same level are more similar than different in terms of content, materials and
expectations.
Be sure the syllabus is updated and given to teachers on the team. A syllabus includes: course
objectives, materials, an outline of major weekly assignments and assessments, and weighting of
grades.
Coordinate testing /assessment either by creating models for adaptation or setting up a system by
which all team members can collaborate in creating assessment instruments; ensure consistency of
all summative assessments.
Make exit assessments available to all teachers on the team at the beginning of the term.
Confer with team members on students with borderline grades.
Support instructors on the team; support future leads in transition whenever possible.
Solicit input from the team regarding textbook selection, and make recommendations to the
Associate Director.

Instructor/Team Member Responsibilities
















Teach assigned classes.
Adhere to copyright laws in preparing class materials.
Prepare course descriptions, including a weekly syllabus, for each class at the beginning of the term
(one copy to each student and one in an electronic file on the AEI Network.
Generate and share materials and activities to flesh out the course outline.
Prepare own daily lesson plans covering the specified objectives, and adhering to the curriculum
guide and weekly syllabus.
Attend and constructively participate in all scheduled team meetings.
Provide input to lead instructor on textbooks and materials.
Adapt and/or co-create assessment instruments according to the objectives and template.
Ensure that validity and integrity in assessment are maintained in every class.
Adhere to agreed-upon weighting of grades.
Utilize available university technology support to increase technological competence as needed.
Have students read and sign attendance policy and release of information forms on the first day of
class (Reading/Writing/Grammar teachers only).
Evaluate the language skills of NEW students during the first week of classes to verify level
placement. If evaluation appears to warrant a level change, the instructor may consult with an
experienced instructor at the next level for confirmation. For RETURNING students, see placement
policy under Placement and Evaluation.
Keep accurate attendance in all classes. The AEI has a strict attendance policy, a copy of which is
passed out to students at the beginning of every term. Teachers download attendance rosters each
week of the term from http://babel.uoregon.edu/aei/instructors/. At the end each week, teachers
record attendance on the website. In addition, teachers must always keep their own attendance
records.

20













When the main office puts an Urgent Summons (red slip) in your mailbox, please give it to the
student at the beginning of the next class period. The student must leave class immediately, report
to the office, give the required information, and have the red slip signed. When the signed red slip is
returned to you, the student may rejoin the class.
Return student papers and homework in a reasonable amount of time. This is especially important
in Reading/Writing/Grammar classes.
Give out written midterm evaluations (grades, attendance, and comments) to each student by the
end of the fifth week of classes using the standardized midterm evaluation form at
http://babel.uoregon.edu/aei/instructors/.
Submit end of the term grades on http://babel.uoregon.edu/aei/instructors/. Include comments
about students who are retained and those who are promoted on the basis of a final assessment.
These explanatory comments are used by the Academic Advising Office in counseling students.
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


Submit nominations for the Directors Distinction list to the Academic Advising Office (RWG
instructors only).
Put a complete set of materials and procedures used in all classes for each course in the appropriate
folder on the Network.
Notify the AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator as early as possible when requiring a substitute and
provide the substitute with complete lesson plans.
Add the AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator to your Blackboard class site for access in the event of
illness or absence.

Program duties










Demonstrate flexibility and versatility in teaching assignments and scheduling, at the Director’s
request.
Attend all scheduled IEP and general staff meetings.
Participate in new student orientation, registration and placement testing as assigned by the
Associate Director.
Participate in curriculum discussions and course changes.
Be available to substitute, if needed, once or twice a term if appointed at 1.0 FTE (See Policies and
Procedures for Faculty/Staff42). Substitute for conference participants, if necessary. It is possible
to do this on a quid pro quo basis.
Participate in both formative and summative aspects of the evaluation procedure, as required.
Participate in the teacher-training mission of the AEI by allowing observers and working with
Linguistics Department students when necessary. This should not, however, be allowed to disrupt
the normal functioning of classes.
Meet deadlines for turning in all official forms (e.g., intent to re-enroll, attendance, student
evaluations, Director’s Distinction list, grades).
Engage in other professional activity as appropriate, such as materials development, conferences,
presentation of papers, and workshops (see position descriptions).

INSTRUCTOR RESPONSIBILITIES, Academic English for International Students Program (AEIS)

Contract time frames
Both adjunct and career NTTF instructors are expected to be on or available for duty from the first day of
new student testing until the Friday following the last day of finals week. Instructors should be accessible
to the Director by email or phone for consultation during non-teaching weeks. When this is not possible,
the Director must be notified in advance.
Teaching and Program Duties

21




















Teach classes. AEIS classes have no waiting list. Any unregistered student should be counseled to
monitor Duckweb for possible openings during the first two weeks of class.
Adhere to copyright laws in preparing class materials.
Demonstrate flexibility and versatility in teaching assignments and scheduling, at the Associate
Director’s request.
Prepare course descriptions, including a weekly syllabus, for each class at the beginning of the term
(one copy to each student and one in the appropriate folder on the Network).
Consult at regular intervals with any other instructors teaching the same class at the same level to
ensure consistency of curriculum delivery.
Return student papers in a timely manner. This is especially important in writing classes.
Submit grades at the end of the term via UO’s online grade roster.
Have a day-by-day syllabus completed and available on the network by the end of the term.
Attend all scheduled AEIS and general staff meetings.
Participate in placement testing at the beginning of each term.
Participate in curriculum discussions and changes concerning classes being taught.
Be available to substitute, if needed, once or twice a term if appointed at 1.0 FTE. (See Policies and
Procedures.) Substitute for conference participants, if necessary. It is possible to do this on a quid
pro quo basis.
Participate in both formative and summative aspects of the evaluation procedure, as required.
Participate in the teacher-training mission of the AEI by allowing observers and working with
Linguistics Department students when necessary. This should not, however, be allowed to disrupt
the normal functioning of classes.
Engage in other professional activity as appropriate, such as materials development, conferences,
presentation of papers, workshops (see position descriptions).
Add the AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator to your Blackboard class site for access in the event of
illness or absence.

INSTRUCTOR RESPONSIBILITIES, Distance Education Program
Contract time frames
All instructors should be accessible to the Director and the Distance Education (DE) Coordinator by email
or phone for consultation during teaching and non-teaching weeks. When this is not possible, the Director
and Distance Education Director must be notified in advance.
Teaching duties









Teach online courses, ensuring that curriculum materials are updated every term, as needed.
Prepare course descriptions, including a weekly syllabus, for each class at the beginning of the term
and post to course website and/or course management system.
Copy forward course materials to the current course section(s) in Blackboard, Nicenet, etc.
Enroll participants in courses.
Make sure the AEI Director and Distance Education Director are enrolled in courses with
instructor-level access. Also be sure to cross-enroll other AEI faculty who are teaching the same
course for this term, so we have back-up access to the course in case of emergency. Confirm with DE
Director and the DE Assistant the opening date for orientation activities for the course so
participants can receive instructor and login information in advance.
Email a welcome message to the course participants with information about the course content and
expectations along with instructions for getting started.
Make sure the course is available and not hidden or locked from user access.

22


















Set and publish to the course site a weekly cycle of deadlines for participants to complete
assignments and for instructor feedback/posting of grades in a timely manner.
Monitor participant activity on a daily basis—especially attentively the first 2 weeks of class—and
contact them to offer support, trouble-shooting tips, etc.
Keep DE Director up-to-date on participants who are “no show” so we can proactively contact local
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


sponsors and alums to get help bringing stragglers on board.
Meet regularly with co-instructors (courses with multiple sections, team-taught courses, etc.) to
share tips and resources, trouble-shoot, sync up on practices, etc.
Midterm: Create a column in the online course grade book which gives participants their relative
scores and status (pass vs. no pass) for midterm. Continue to keep DE Director up-to-date on
participants who are “no show” so we can proactively contact local sponsors and alums to get help
bringing stragglers on board, as appropriate, and alert sponsors to participants’ current course
status.
In the last 2 weeks of the course, remind participants to back-up copies of any resources they want
to save (BB course sites will close at end of the term).
Email participants individually with a final grade report + notice in PDF format as to whether or not
they passed the course. Cc the DE Director on all grade reports.
Submit grades to DE Asst (eteacher@uoregon.edu) following instructions from the DE Asst. Be sure
to include detailed explanations for anyone who did not complete the course.
Sign course certificates—including spares—and return them to the DE Assistant for mailing during
the break.
Clean up all course materials to prepare for copy forward for next term (to Blackboard, Nicenet,
etc.)
Archive on AEINetwork => Distance Ed Faculty-Staff => 2011-12 Academic Year => 200xxx (Term
Year):
o Copies of participants projects.
o Copies of instructor feedback/rubrics on participants projects.
o An exported final copy of the course grade book (please *hide* all names of guest
moderators and other non-students before doing so) and participants; grade reports.
o Any other curriculum or administrative files relevant to the course.
The AEI Main Office collects end-of-course evaluation results in PDF format to (a) archive
confidentially in AEInetwork Course Evaluations folder, and (b) send copies to instructors.

Program duties










Demonstrate flexibility and versatility in teaching assignments, course development, and
scheduling, at the Director’s request.
Attend all scheduled DE and general staff meetings.
Participate in curriculum discussions and course changes.
Be available to substitute, if needed. Substitute for conference participants, if necessary. It is
possible to do this on a quid pro quo basis or to arrange to team-teach in advance.
Participate in both formative and summative aspects of the evaluation procedure, as required.
Participate in the teacher-training mission of the AEI by allowing observers and working with
Linguistics Department students when necessary. (This should not, however, be allowed to disrupt
the normal functioning of classes.)
Meet deadlines for turning in all official forms (student evaluations, grades, reports to sponsors,
etc.).
Engage in other professional activity as appropriate, such as materials development, conferences,
presentation of papers, and workshops (see position descriptions).

23



FACULTY ANNUAL REVIEW AND PROMOTION
Annual Faculty Review
All AEI faculty, adjunct and career, are required to be part of a review process. They are evaluated in the
areas of teaching, administrative responsibilities, professional development, and service. These areas are
consistent with university requirements for evaluating all faculty members. At the end of spring term,
career faculty members submit specified documents to a review committee that is made up of three to five
AEI career faculty members. Adjunct instructors submit their review materials to the director. Information
from the review committee evaluation of career faculty is used by the director in making personnel
decisions, such as hiring, merit raises, and promotion. Adjunct review materials are used by the director in
making hiring decisions.
[See Appendix 1, AEI Faculty Review Policy, for a detailed description of policy and procedures in
this area.]
Promotion
AEI faculty may move from one instructor position to another. A career instructor may move to senior by
going through the universitys senior instructor review process after eighteen academic year terms at .5
FTE or higher years as a career-track instructor (See the AEI Senior Instructor Review document for
details). Adjunct faculty may become career-track instructors when selected through an AEI national
search for new instructors.

[See Appendix 2, Criteria for Promotion, for a detailed description of AEI policy and procedures in
this area.]
Hiring and Discharg e/Layoff
Because the AEI is enrollment dependent, layoffs at the end of a term or last minute hiring at the beginning
of a term are to be expected. These are determined by the type of position and terms of individual
contracts. Contracts also may not be renewed when AEI duties are not conducted according to the
expectations of the unit. University of Oregon hiring and discharge/layoff policies and procedures are
followed (See University of Oregon Faculty Handbook for details).
Rehiring

Rehiring of faculty from contract to contract depends first on the numbers of expected students for
subsequent terms. Senior career faculty is rehired first, then C1/C2, then adjunct faculty and finally retired
faculty. Criteria for rehiring include seniority and needs of the institute, with program need taking
precedence.
Seniority

24



Seniority is the amount of time working at the AEI (as opposed to cumulative experience in other places),
taking into account both number of terms at the AEI and total FTE. Seniority is determined within each
contract category: C1/C2, C3, and D or E. The factors listed below will be considered in determining
seniority:

1. Terms at the AEI. Total number of terms at the AEI will be counted, noting full time FTE and part time
FTE. Summer terms will be credited since AEI summer terms are like any other term and have additional
demands for faculty to work in special programs.
2. Offsite work arranged through the AEI. For example, work in Ukraine or with the School of
Education/Business as part of a grant or other agreed upon arrangements.
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


3. Faculty exchanges. For example, when a faculty member works at another institution and their faculty
member comes here.
4. Fulbright or other similar language-oriented programs. Any Fulbright or other projects related to
language work (for example, Peace Corps) that is approved beforehand by the AEI director will be
considered.
The following factors will NOT be considered in determining seniority:

1. Leave of absence. When faculty take leaves of absence for family or health reasons, this time will not be
counted as work time.
2. GTF time. The time spent as a GTF at the AEI will not be counted towards total time here. Such
appointments are made by the Linguistics Dept. and do not go through AEI usual hiring and evaluation
process.
Program need
Program need is defined by the technical expertise and specialized qualifications required for a specific
function (ex: IT expertise for the technology coordinator position, counseling background for adviser role, PhD
for teaching in the Linguistics department). The Director will have the responsibility to identify/define
program need and specialized qualifications necessary to meet that need. Faculty credentials will be a
component in rehiring decisions only as they relate to program need. Few administrative assignments meet
program need criterion because career faculty can fill most administrative functions.

25



PLACEMENT AND EVALUATION
Intensive English Program
Initial Placement and Testing
All new students are tested when they first arrive. This is to determine which class level each student
should be placed into. Accuplacer, a computer adaptive placement testing system developed by The College
Entrance Examination Board, is used.
Three Accuplacer tests are used to assess students during the initial assessment period: ESL Sentence
Meaning, ESL Reading Skills, and WritePlacer ESL.

The Accuplacer was examined for reliability and validity by the developers at the college board by means of
various studies. In January of 2010 the IEP conducted a pilot study to establish placement benchmarks. The
placement system was initiated in spring 2010. We have observed reasonable language proficiency
homogeneity at each level. Also, on the basis of the number of Student Change Forms processed per term,
reliability is determined.
Initial Placement Procedures

Placement decisions are made by the Academic Adviser and the Associate Director using the Placement
Testing rubric found in the AEI Curriculum Guide. For placement in Reading, Writing, Grammar class the
student’s scores on the Writing and Sentence Meaning subtests are used in accordance with the rubric. For
placement in Oral Skills, the student’s scores in the Listening and Sentence Meaning subtest are totaled, and
the rubric uses the composite score for level placement. Students can be placed in different levels in Oral
Skills and literate courses, but because skills are integrated in IP courses, students are rarely placed more
than one level apart in these courses. Students placed in level three or below are never placed more than
one level apart.
Placement of Returning Students

Returning students will be placed in classes at the level indicated by their previous instructors. Any
returning student who wishes to take the placement tests may do so by registering in the Academic
Advising office by Friday of orientation week and signing an agreement to accept the results of placement
testing. The AEI will use test results to place the student in the appropriate level.
Placement Verification in the First Week of Classes

Instructors receive class rosters before the first day of class. Students attending a class but not on the
roster should remain in the class until the instructor has been able to clarify their placement.

During the first week of class, instructors evaluate the English abilities of NEW students to verify that they
have been placed correctly. New students should be informed that, if they wish to be considered for a
placement change, they are required to attend classes and do the required assignments during the first few

26



days. In oral skills classes, assignments and activities that provide input on both the student’s listening and
speaking abilities should be considered. In Reading/Writing/Grammar classes, assignments and activities
that provide information about both reading and writing abilities should be considered. Instructors are
encouraged to consult with colleagues teaching at the same and adjacent levels if they are uncertain about
moving a student to a different level.

If a new student feels the placement is too easy or difficult, he/she should tell the instructor. If an instructor
feels a class is too easy or too difficult for the student, the student’s placement may change. If the decision is
made to change the students level, the instructor sends the student to the Academic Adviser with a note to
that effect. Instructors receive an official, written notification of any changes. Students may not change
levels after the first two weeks of class.
Oral skills instructors wishing to move a student up a level should consider the literate placement of that
student and consult with the Academic Adviser if the student is new. A disparity of two or more levels
between literate and oral skills is not usually allowed. For instance, a student in literate Level 3 will likely
not have the necessary reading/writing skills to work effectively in Level 5 oral skills.
Student requests for section changes for reasons of time or family arrangements are handled by the
Academic Adviser and will be considered only in unusual circumstances and when space is available.
Grading Procedures

Weekly attendance as well as midterm and final grades are recorded using the on-line attendance and
grading system: http://babel.uoregon.edu/aei/instructors/. Student Proficiency Reports are
maintained on all IEP students. These reports are stored in individual student folders in the Admissions
Office. There is also a backup copy of all proficiency reports stored in the database in the Previous Terms
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


folder.

On the Student Proficiency Report, each student receives a final grade as a percentage score in each core
class based on his/her ability to meet the proficiency objectives of the course. A final grade of 80% or more
indicates success in the course and promotion to the next level. A final grade of 79% or less indicates that
the student requires further skill development before being promoted to the next level and the student is
retained. To assist students and others in understanding the percentage score, the proficiency report
includes a prose interpretation of the proficiency score.
If a student is retained, the teacher makes an explanatory notation in the “Non-Promotion Comments”
section of the final grade report. If a student with a proficiency score of 79% or less is promoted on the
basis of final assessments, the teacher makes an explanatory notation in the “Promotion Comments”
section.

In addition to the proficiency percentage, all students receive a rating in each of the following areas: effort,
homework, improvement, and class participation. The scale for these ratings ranges from 1 to 5 with 1
being excellent, 2 good, 3 average, 4 poor, and 5 very poor. These ratings reflect a student’s strengths and
weaknesses as demonstrated in performance in the course. The ratings are used by the Academic Adviser
when she counsels students on their progress, consults with faculty about students of concern or writes
letters of recommendation to academic programs.

Elective course grades are also included on the Student Proficiency Report. Grades in electives are Pass/No
Pass. (Elective classes meet week 2 through week 8.)

Accessibility to student grade reports is governed by university policy. All faculty members have access to
these reports as needed, but they are appropriately protected from casual perusal by storage in the office of
the AEI Admissions Coordinator. Students must give written permission to share academic records with
parents, sponsors or other interested entities.

27



To maintain level integrity, it is important that students be promoted only when they have demonstrated
adequate proficiency to succeed at the next level. Weighting of course assessments must be carefully
calculated to reflect students’ level of proficiency in skills listed as course objectives.
If a student is retained, the teacher makes an explanatory notation in the “Non-Promotion Comments”
section of the final grade report. If a student with a proficiency score of 79% or less is promoted on the
basis of final assessments, the teacher makes an explanatory notation in the “Promotion Comments”
section.
Syllabus requirements

Instructors must provide students with a syllabus the first day they attend class. The syllabus should
include:
• Instructor’s contact information and office hours
• Brief description of the course’s goals, objectives and activities
• Course outline
• Textbooks and any other required and/or recommended materials
• Grading policy and weighting of grades
• Promotion criteria
• Attendance policy
• Classroom expectations
• Academic honesty statement
• Accessibility statement
• Complaint policy
• Late work and final assessment policy
Late work and final assessment policy

The faculty has agreed that class assignments must be turned in on time and that mid-term and final exams
must be taken on the day administered.
Midterm evaluation s

IEP students must receive written notice of their progress in all core classes by the end of week 5. Students
receive written mid-term reports in all core classes using the on-line attendance and grading system:
https://babel.uoregon.edu/aei/instructors/. These include a current proficiency percentage,
performance ratings, hours of absence and comments about the student’s performance and progress.
Comments are directed toward students to encourage and advise them of their current standing in the
class. When it is evident that a student is making insufficient progress toward the course objectives, the
instructor may take a number of steps including conferencing with the student, requesting additional
tutoring, consulting with the Academic Adviser and/or the student’s other instructors. By these means, the
instructor offers the student opportunities to improve.
Final Grading

The IEP grading database is at:
https://babelssl.uoregon.edu/aei/instructors
Core Courses

28



• Students in core courses (RWG and OS) are given a proficiency score based on assessed tests,
assignments and activities. This is expressed as a whole number percentage. Do not use any decimal
units.
• Students in core courses also receive performance descriptor scores (1 to 5) for effort, homework,
participation and improvement. Ratings on performance attributes should be used in a way that
explains/justifies the final grade. When a student questions a low grade, the academic advisers uses the
ratings to talk with the student about the source(s) of the problem. So, for instance, if a students final
grade is 90%, ratings of 1 and 2 in all or most of the performance attributes would be expected. If a
students final grade is 60%, ratings of 3, 4 and 5 would be more likely. If there is a final grade of 60%
with high performance scores, the instructor can explain the dichotomy in the “Non-promotion
Comments” box.
• Students with a proficiency score of 80% or better are promoted to the next level. Instructors can
choose to double-promote students whose skills exceed the course objectives at the subsequent level. It
is recommended that the students work be discussed with an instructor teaching at the higher level
before making a decision to double-promote. Also, check the students level in the other skill area
(literate or oral) to be sure that those skills are advanced enough to do the work at such a high level.
Remember that students have the right to challenge their placement by taking Accuplacer with the new
students on Tuesday of orientation week.
• Students with a proficiency score of less than 80% can be promoted on the basis of their performance
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


on end-of-term assessments. In this case, the instructor enters an explanation in the “Promotion
Comments” box. Note that this does NOT apply to Level 6, where students need to earn a passing grade
in order to be recommended for UO admission.
• For students who are not promoted, the instructor enters an explanation in the “Non-promotion
Comments” box. The end-of-term comments, both for promotion and non-promotion, are for the
advisers’ use in talking with students, so they can be geared towards that purpose. Students do not get a
copy of your comments.
• Retain/promote/double-promote is represented on the grade form as 0/1/2.

Elective courses
• Elective courses are graded Pass/No Pass (P/NP). No performance descriptor scores (effort, homework,
etc.) are given for electives.
• The grade (P or NP) is typed into the Proficiency (%) box.

Academic Probation
Students with more than 25 hours of absence who earn a grade of less than 80% in a core course (RWG or
OS) are placed on academic probation the next term they enroll in the program. At registration, they meet
with an academic adviser, who informs them of their status, inquires about difficulties in the previous term,
and communicates the consequences should they fail to pass their classes in the coming term. Students
who do not pass while on probation are disqualified from the program. If they are conditionally admitted to
UO, they lose their ability to enroll. In this case, students wishing to be reinstated in the IEP or to attend UO
must attend another school for at least six months, perform successfully and write a petition letter to the
AEI Director.
Non-Successful Students
Students who attend class regularly but fail a core class are invited to meet with an academic adviser to
discuss success strategies. The success plan is shared with the instructor via email.

Referral to the Academic Advising Office
One means of responding to students whose behavior does not meet classroom expectations is to refer
them to an Academic Adviser. The instructor fills out a referral form (copies available in the Copy Room,
106 Pacific). The form is given to the student with instructions to meet with an Academic Adviser before
returning to class. The Academic Adviser discusses the concerns with the student, and together they

29



formulate a plan of action. The student then returns the form to the instructor. A copy is kept in the
Academic Advising Office.

In egregious cases, the UO Office of Student Life can assist. The Student Conduct Code can be found at
http://www.uoregon.edu/~stl/programs/student_judi_affairs/conduct-code.htm
Director’s Distinction List

In week 8, Reading/Writing/Grammar instructors submit names of students whom they wish to recognize
for academic excellence. These students are awarded a special certificate at the end of the term.
Attendance Certificates and End-of Term Celebrations

Reading/Writing/Grammar instructors distribute attendance certificates to eligible students on the last
day of class. Instructors may plan a brief celebration or party to mark the end of the term. However, the
event should not replace the final day of instruction, so it should take up less than half an hour of class time.
Instructors may be reimbursed for up to $15 of celebration expenses by submitting receipts with
appropriate identifying information.
ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Members of the university community are expected to be honest and forthright in their academic
endeavors. To cheat on an examination corrupts the essential process by which knowledge is
advanced. The Student Conduct Code of the University of Oregon prohibits any form of
academic dishonesty. Below are some excerpts from the Code which pertain to IEP
students:







Disciplinary action may be initiated by the University and sanctions imposed against any student or
student organization found guilty of committing, attempting to commit, or intentionally

assisting in the commission of any of the following prohibited forms of conduct:

Dishonesty, including academic cheating, academic plagiarism (submission of the work of others for
academic credit without indicating the source), or knowingly furnishing false information to

University officers of instruction or administration.

Forgery, alteration, or unauthorized use of University documents, records, keys, student identification,
or keycards.
Intentional disruption, obstruction, or interference with the process of instruction, research,
administration, student discipline, or any other service or activity provided or sponsored by the

University.

A copy of the Student Conduct Code can be found in the University of Oregons Schedule of
Classes, and on the Internet at http://www.uoregon.edu/~stl/code.htm

There is an excellent section on handling suspected academic dishonesty in the U of O Faculty
Handbook (http://academicaffairs.uoregon.edu/content/chapter-vii#). Although the handbook
advises that all acts of alleged academic dishonesty be officially reported, the AEI recognizes
that many IEP students may not be fully aware of U.S. cultural norms in this area. Therefore,
IEP instructors are urged to discuss their observations with the student(s) in a non-accusing way,
providing cultural information when appropriate, and to follow the procedures below.
IEP Procedures in Cases of Academic Dishonesty

30



The IEP follows the UO procedures in cases of academic misconduct, with several modifications. Charges of
cheating, plagiarism and fabrication are defined in the UO Student Conduct Code. Consult the Faculty Guide
for Addressing Academic Misconduct (see the academic adviser for a copy of this document) from the UO
Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. Here is an outline of the procedures, with
modifications based on the recognition that IEP students are in the process of acquiring U.S. academic
cultural norms.

When an instructor believes that a student has cheated or plagiarized, s/he:
• Checks with an academic adviser to see if the student file contains a past Academic Adviser Referral
for academic dishonesty.
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


• If “yes,” follow the procedures in the UO document. In this case, the incident and sanctions are
always reported to the Director of Student Conduct and Community Standards.
• If “no,” follow these steps:
o Promptly notify the student of the suspected incident. Use this wording, taken from the UO
Faculty Guide for Addressing Academic Misconduct:

o

o

“I have discovered a suspected incident of academic misconduct, as defined in the
University of Oregon Student Conduct Code. Please contact me immediately to
discuss the incident and have an opportunity to explain the incident. You have the
right to have this matter referred directly to the Director of Student Conduct and
Community Standards rather than discussing it with me. If you prefer that option,
please immediately inform me of your choice.”

Meet with the student to discuss the incident. If the student admits to the behavior, impose
sanctions. The student must be provided with written notice of the sanctions. If the student
accepts the sanctions, fill out the top half of the brown Academic Adviser Referral and send
the student to meet with an academic adviser. The adviser will develop a plan of action with
the student and place a copy of the completed form in the student’s file in the AEI office.
If the student does not admit to the behavior and/or does not accept the sanctions, the case
should be reported to the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards within 14
days of the date you notified the student of suspected academic misconduct (excluding
breaks and holidays). The academic advising office, 160 Pacific, can give you the reporting
form.

Academic English for International Students Program
Testing
All new international students at the UO with a TOEFL score of less than 575 (paper-based) or 88 (internetbased), or a score of less than 7 on IELTS, are given the Accuplacer test battery, which includes:
WritePlacer, Reading Comprehension, and ESL Listening.
Writing assessments are also given at the beginning of AEIS writing classes to ascertain correct placement,
and again on the last day of class. This information is used by writing instructors, together with a students
course grade, to determine placement for a subsequent term, or successful completion of the AEIS writing
program. AEIS classes do not ordinarily meet during finals week.
Placement

31



Students are placed into Introductory Academic Oral Communication (AEIS 101) or Advanced Academic
Oral Communication (AEIS 102) based on results from the Accuplacer ESL Listening test. These courses
are sequential, so students testing into AEIS 101 will first have to complete that course before taking AEIS
102.

For Academic Writing classes, students are placed into one of three sequential levels: AEIS 110, 111, 112,
or they are exempted from AEIS writing classes based on their WritePlacer test score. Students exempting
from AEIS writing classes are likely to have additional writing requirements as determined by the English
Department. For Reading Academic Discourse (AEIS 107) or Advanced Reading Academic Discourse (AEIS
108), students placed into one of the course or exempted based on the Accuplacer Reading Comprehension
test. It is strongly advised that students not enroll in reading classes until their writing proficiency is at the
level of AEIS 111 or AEIS 112. Students completing AEIS 107 are strongly advised, but not required, to take
AEIS 108. Academic counseling for students is handled by the International Affairs student adviser.
Grading Policy

The AEIS program follows university guidelines in assigning grades. The guidelines can be found at:
http://www.uoregon.edu/~registrar/common/grading_system.htm

CURRICULUM
Intensive English Program
Organization
The Associate Director is responsible for supervising IEP curriculum. Assisting the Instructional
Coordinator is the IEP Faculty. The Associate Director may also constitute committees or request release
time for faculty members to work on projects relevant to the curriculum or assessment. Each term, lead
instructors are appointed for each level’s core classes. For example, at level 5, there are two lead
instructors: one for Reading/Writing/Grammar and one for Oral Skills. Lead instructors are responsible
for the curriculum of all sections at each level and facilitate the collaboration of faculty. Consulting with the
instructors teaching the class at the same level, the lead teacher documents the curriculum, and by working
with the other instructors, ensures curricular cohesion. In addition, lead teachers from all levels meet
periodically to discuss/ensure the vertical flow of the curriculum from level-to-level. Lead instructors also
maintain the course folders stored on the AEI network to document the class on a term-to-term basis.
Curriculum Review, Evaluation, and Change

The IEP curriculum is reviewed and evaluated by the entire faculty with the Associate Director leading the
discussions. The faculty on a term-by-term and yearly basis is responsible for the ongoing evaluation of the
IEP offerings in light of current research, as well as student, faculty, and program needs. On a term-by-term
basis, there is ongoing assessment of the curriculum obtained through student feedback in course
evaluations, instructor feedback, and student feedback provided by an Academic Adviser. There is also a
yearly ongoing self-study of the curriculum each Fall Term in which the faculty conducts a holistic
assessment of the curriculum, taking into account student needs, student population, and teacher
recommendations. All faculty are encouraged to participate so that all viewpoints are represented and all
expertise can be brought to the review process. Also during the yearly review, the faculty monitors the
effectiveness of assessment and placement testing to ensure it meets the needs of the students and

32



maintains the integrity of the IEP program.

While instructors are expected and encouraged to make changes in daily lessons to reflect the immediate
needs of students, there are times when instructors see a need for a significant change in a course. A
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


significant change is defined as any change that affects the inventory of skills throughout the curriculum or
defining components of a course. When an instructor sees a need for a curriculum modification, he/she first
proposes the change to companion teachers. Teachers create a Curriculum Change Initiative (CCI), which is
then taken to the Associate Director, who then evaluates the request in light of how it affects the length,
structure, staffing, or budget of the IEP. With the approval of the Associate Director, teachers prepare an
in-service presentation for the faculty. The faculty evaluates the proposal in light of the existing curriculum.
If a change is supported, the proposal is forwarded to the Director for final approval. If approved, the
instructors create a timeline and an implementation plan under the supervision of the Associate Director. If
a proposed change raises concerns, instructors have the opportunity to reflect on and respond to the
concerns at a later faculty meeting.
Planning Information

New instructors receive a curriculum guide, a book list, relevant class materials, and a course syllabus to
start the term. Under the guidance of their lead instructor(s), they should prepare daily lesson plans
consistent with the curriculum and the course objectives.
When making lesson plans, be aware of several time factors:







On the first day of term, Reading/Writing/Grammar teachers will be asked to pass out and explain
an attendance policy, activity waiver, and release of information forms in class. These forms should
be filled out in class and collected before the students leave the room.
All four terms contain official vacation days. These dates can be found on the term schedule sheet
and in the UO bulletin.
In week 4 or 5, RWG instructors distribute Intent to Re-enroll forms. These should be filled out in
class, alpha-sorted and returned to the AEI office by the given deadline.
Classes, especially at the upper levels, may be dismissed one day per term for the institutional
TOEFL test if more than 50% of the students in the class are registered to take the test.
During the final week, some time will be required for students to fill out class evaluations.

Students wanting/needing to pass the TOEFL are a constant issue for teachers. A minimum score of 500
(paper-based TOEFL), 61 (internet-based) TOEFL, or 6 (IELTS) is required for UO admission (PBT 475 or
IBT 53 for LCC admission). From the very earliest levels, realistic expectations about passing the TOEFL
should be encouraged. Only students successfully completing level 6 are "expected" to pass the TOEFL,
even though some do so earlier. Certainly, no one should expect to pass the TOEFL before level 5.

Students who have been conditionally admitted to UO can be admitted after having successfully completed
all IEP courses at Level 6. Students wishing to attend LCC may request a letter of recommendation from the
Academic Adviser after having successfully completed all IEP courses at Level 5, with a minimum PBT score
of 460.
Materials

All IEP teachers are given a curriculum guide. Course materials are updated on the AEI network by lead
instructors on a term-by-term basis. All materials copied for course use must receive copyright clearance.
When resource material is copied, the source, title, and author must be included somewhere on the copied
material.
When possible, only one copy should be put on the AEI Network to be accessed, if necessary, by the next

33



teacher of the class.

As examination copies of new materials come in, they will be stamped “AEI” and placed on the "new
material" shelf in 112A Pacific. Feel free to drop in occasionally and check the shelf for new material.
Anything taken out should be checked out and returned in a timely manner.

If there are not enough texts for a class, instructors should inform the AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator as
soon as possible. Generally, it is a good idea to tell students not to write in their books and to keep their
receipts until they are certain of their placement, so the books can be returned if necessary.

Texts must be ordered for the next term by the end of the 6th week of classes. Please be prepared to discuss
ideas for texts or give input on current texts with lead teachers by that time. Anyone looking for a new text
can find a file of publishers catalogues in 112A Pacific. Most new materials are so designated in the
catalogues.

Academic English for International Students Program (AEIS)
Organization
The Associate Director is responsible for supervising AEIS curriculum. The Associate Director is assisted by
the AEIS faculty, which discusses course content and textbooks, as well as the future directions of the
program. Instructors in the different sections of a given class are expected to follow the general course
outline and the established course objectives. AEIS classes follow the same schedule as other university
classes.
Materials

New instructors should receive a general curriculum description of AEIS courses, a course syllabus and
other resource materials from AEIS faculty at the beginning of the term.

When resource material is copied, the source, title, and author must be included somewhere on the copied
material. One copy should be put in the appropriate folder on the AEI network, avoiding duplication of
existing materials, to be passed on to the next teacher of the class.

If there are not enough texts for a class, instructors should inform the Assistant to the Associate Director as
soon as possible.

Generally, it is a good idea to tell students not to write in their books until they are certain of their
placement, so the books can be returned if necessary. Texts must be ordered for the next term by the fourth
week of classes. Please be prepared to discuss ideas for texts or give input on current texts with the
Associate Director by that time.

34



RESOURCES, FACILITIES, AND EQUIPMENT
Safety
The Department of Public Safety (Straub Hall) responds to on-campus calls for assistance.
Emergencies:
6-6666
Non-emergency:
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


6-5444

Contact the Academic Advising Office for a concern regarding personal safety or the safety of an AEI
student.
Yamada L anguage C enter
The Yamada Language Center is shared by all language teaching departments on campus. The YLC is
located in Pacific 121, across from the AEI office. It is composed of a main office and checkout counter, and
a classroom lab in Pacific 113. The classroom lab can be reserved, but this should be done with
considerable advance notice. The AEI has resources in the YLC for individual student use. Teachers should
acquaint themselves with what is available so they can make suggestions to students for individualized
study.
Computer L abs

The computer lab in Pacific 113 is part of the Yamada Language Center and is shared by all the languageteaching units on campus. It contains 20 Macintosh computers, and the AEI has exclusive use of the lab for
approximately 15 hours per week. This lab can be reserved for both one-time and term-long sessions.
Term-long reservations for various departments are usually made a term in advance. Contact the Assistant
to the Associate Director for a term-long reservation. For a one-time reservation, make a request at
http://babel.uoregon.edu/YLC/RoomRequests/.
In addition, there are a number of other computer labs on campus that can be reserved. The Knight library
has a number of labs (described at http://libweb.uoregon.edu/instruct/classrooms/). Another list of
computer labs can be found at http://it.uoregon.edu/services/computing-labs. Many labs can be reserved
for both one-time and term-long sessions.
Media Services

Media Services is located in the Knight Library. All AEI classes are eligible to use this facility. Instructors
can order equipment for their classrooms, check out materials, and reserve studios. Because Media
Services gives preference to credit courses and because AEI has an extensive library of similar equipment,
IEP instructors should use Media Services facilities sparingly. Instructors should arrange to use YLC and
AEI facilities whenever possible. Stan Hall (6-1944) is the instructional equipment manager, and he can
help with any difficulties in reserving equipment.
Copy/Supply Room

A copy machine and some office supplies are in Pacific 106. Additional copy machines can be found in
Pacific 6 and in the Esslinger offices. Please be frugal in copying and comply with copyright rules. If you

35



have a large copying job, take it to the Campus Copy Center. Copies are usually completed within an hour,
but plan ahead. There are forms to fill out for this purpose in the front office. This saves wear and tear on
the machine and cuts down on the lines waiting for copying, especially at the beginning of the term.

The copy machines are for AEI business only. Personal copying or copying for personal study (i.e.,
dissertation work) should not be done on the AEI machine nor should AEI paper and supplies be used for
such purposes. Copying related to professional conferences and presentations is acceptable, but it is
preferable that teachers plan ahead and use the Campus Copy Center. This type of copying must always
give precedence to copying required for the regular business of the AEI (classes and office work).

Instructors can ask the AEI Clerical Staff for office supplies. Supplies are for AEI offices and classroom
purposes only. There are small refrigerators and microwaves for staff use. Please help to keep these areas
clean and tidy.
Computers and the AEI Network

All offices contain Macintosh computers. Laser printers are generally shared by several instructors. Please
use the laser printer in your area.
Instructors are expected to become familiar with the AEI Network. It contains necessary curriculum
information as well as many files documenting the programs.
Resource Room

Pacific 6 contains the teacher resource room and houses professional books and materials. The key to the
front office also fits this room. Desk copies of required texts can be obtained from the Assistant to the
Associate Director, Pacific 112A. These must be scanned out and will be scanned back into the inventory
system when returned.

Please be sure to sign out all material borrowed. Students, whether from AEI programs or the Linguistics
Department, should not ordinarily be given access to the resource room. In the event of special
circumstances, students allowed access should be supervised at all times. Remember to cross off your name
when returning materials. It is a professional courtesy to return and shelve materials as soon as you have
finished with them.
Telephone/F ax Use

All institutions in the Oregon University System are connected by a telephone network. On-campus can be
dialed using a single number and the extension (see campus directory). All long distance calls require a
special long distance number (given out to only a few administrative positions) or a personal calling card.
Only business calls should be made on office phones and long distance calls should be kept to a minimum.
Off-campus local calls can be made by dialing 9. For long distance calls within the state, dial 9+1+area code.
There is a fax machine in the front office for business use only. The number is (541) 346-3917.
Audio/Video Equipment

Media equipment can be checked out from the AEI front office in Pacific 105. Many campus classrooms are
equipped with CD/DVD players and computer projectors. You can find out what equipment is in a
classroom by checking http://libweb.uoregon.edu/tools/classrooms/ Here is a list of equipment available
for use by AEI instructors.

36



AEI CLASSROOM EQUIPM ENT INVENTORY (2011)
ITEMS
Location
Extron Switcher - MLS 304SA
*
Panasonic Projector F2000 XGA
*
PowerShot SD 400 Digital Camera
*
PowerShot A 60 Digital Camera
*
Samsung L200 Digital Camera
*
Samsung Maxima Zoom 70XL Camera
*
InFocus Portable Projector (3)
*
Apple laptop computers (23)
*
Sony digital handycam (2)
*
iPod Nano and 80GB iPods (7)
*
Laptop Speakers (3)
*
iPod Dock and Speakers (3)
*
Flip Cameras (20)
*
iPod Microphones (3)
*
HandyCam Bluetooth
*
Macintosh World Travel Adaptor Kit (3)
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


*
Pana-Vue 1 Slide Viewer Kodak
*
Ektagraphic Slide Projector III
*
Logan Light Box- "Desk Top"
*
TV/DVD/VCR/CD/OHP (Maintained by Media Services)
105 Pacific, 347, 348, 349 McKenzie, 193
Esslinger, A202, A306, A307 NCU
Ricoh Copier/Scanner/Printer
06 Pacific, 106 Pacific, Esslinger Office Area
Apple laptop computers (5)
Yamada Language Lab, 113 Pacific

*See the Faculty Services Coordinator in Esslinger in order to check out equipment. All are available for
instructor use, but should not be moved from offices without prior arrangements.

37



POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS
Banner
All AEI students are on Banner, the computerized enrollment system for all university students. If you get
feedback from students that they are having problems in using UO student facilities, inform the AEI
receptionist.
Students with disabilities and universal design of instruction

The University of Oregon is dedicated to the principles of equal opportunity in education and an acceptance
of diversity as an affirmation of individual identity within a welcoming community. Disability is recognized
as an aspect of diversity integral to the university and to society. (from the UO Disability Services website)
The AEI celebrates the diversity of its student community, and we welcome applications from students
with disabilities. We work to provide an educational environment that is usable by and inclusive of all
students, using the approach of universal design of instruction. To watch a 13-minute video on universal
design in post-secondary settings, check out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AY6PhtCLrTg

Faculty are required to include a statement on inclusion on the class syllabus. Here is a sample statement.
You may modify it as needed. Questions? The Academic Advising office can help.
Sample syllabus statement:

The University of Oregon is working to create inclusive learning environments. This means that we
recognize that people learn in different ways and may have learning challenges. I want to make it possible
for every student to be successful in this class. If there are ways I can help you succeed, please talk with me
as soon as possible. You can also talk with someone at Disability Services in 164 Oregon Hall. The email
address is disabsrv@uoregon.edu. Here’s the website:
http://ds.uoregon.edu/DS_Pages/DS_SupportServices.html
AEIS Student Complaints
Students taking AEIS classes follow UO procedures to file a complaint. Direct the students to UO’s “Know
Your Rights’ website: http://asuo.uoregon.edu/studentinfo.php?a=13
IEP Student C omplaints

38



Sometimes students may feel that they have been treated unfairly or inappropriately by an instructor, a
staff person, a host parent, a tutor, or another AEI employee. They may disagree with a decision made by
an instructor or by an AEI administrator. They may believe that another student has wronged them. The
AEI has developed a complaint procedure to provide a structure that addresses the needs of students with
complaints about the Institute.
How to respond to a student’s concern

1. If a student approaches you with a concern about your instruction, the AEI curriculum, or another
classroom matter, respond in a professional manner with information consistent with language
learning theory and instruction, the AEI curriculum design, and common sense.

2. If you are unsure or would like to explore options before responding to the student’s concern, you
may want to consult with the Academic Adviser.

3. At the time of your response, remind the student that there is a complaint procedure in the Student
Handbook, which can be used to elevate his/her concern to the level of a complaint.

If the concern is about …,










level placement
class schedule
academic policy
a classmates behavior
an instructors behavior

then refer the student to the …
Academic Advising Office

a host family situation

Homestay Coordinator

a computer lab monitor

AEI Receptionist

a tutor

the AEI office staff

Tutor Coordinator

Office Manager

Complaint Process Overview
Stage
1

Person
Student

Action
States concern to appropriate AEI administrator (see chart above).

39



2

AEI Administrator

3

Student

4

AEI Director

1. Responds to student’s concern. Informs student that he/she may address
a complaint to the AEI Director.
1.
3.

Requests an appointment with the Director, verbally or in writing, to
discuss complaint.

Meets with the student and records the complaint on the Complaint and
Resolution Record form. Student and Director sign the form.

4.

Investigates the complaint.

6.

Discusses the complaint at the quarterly IEP meeting with the Academic
Adviser and Admissions Coordinator. Group considers whether any
change in policies or procedures is warranted.

5.

Responds in writing to the student within ten (10) working days. If
student is dissatisfied, student may complain to the Linguistics
Department Head.

Complaint resolution outside the AEI
A student may prefer to take the complaint to someone outside the AEI. The University of Oregon has ways
in which students can file formal complaints regarding discrimination, academic policy, or student conduct.
For students alleging discrimination by faculty or staff members, contact the Office of Affirmative Action
http://aaeo.uoregon.edu/

Students wishing to file a grievance involving another student need to contact the Office of Student Conduct
and Community Standards
http://uodos.uoregon.edu/StudentConductandCommunityStandards/tabid/68/Default.aspx

To read about the student formal grievance procedure, go to:
http://aaeo.uoregon.edu/booklet.html#student

Student Services Review Plan
The review plan was updated in fall 2010. The purpose of this written plan is to document the procedure
in place for annual review of AEI student services by IEP students.

Items to be reviewed: The review will consider student satisfaction with the following services:
• The homestay program

40










The tutor program
The UO Community Education Program (CEP)
IP electives offerings
Student day trips
Airport pick-up
UO campus organizations and resources: International Student Association, Outdoor Program,
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


Craft Center, etc.

Procedures for the review: The Homestay Coordinator will solicit homestay program evaluations from all
students participating in the homestay program every term and make results available to the Director.
The Tutor Coordinator will solicit tutor program evaluations from all students participating in the tutor
program every term and make results available to the Director.

The Academic Advisers will conduct an online survey once a year in spring term to elicit their feedback on
the quality and usefulness of pre-arrival information, orientation week activities and meetings, student
activities, IEP elective classes and UO resources. The Head Adviser compiles a report which is reviewed
during summer term by relevant administrators and staff. Student recommendations are routed to those
responsible for that area. Outcomes are discussed at week 7 meetings each term until all recommendations
have been evaluated and decisions made.
The Director meets with:
• The homestay coordinator to discuss necessary modifications to the homestay program
• The tutor coordinator to discuss necessary modifications to the tutor program
• The week 7 meeting members, including the Head Academic Adviser, Admissions Coordinator,
Student Services Coordinator, Marketing Director and Associate Director to discuss necessary
modifications to student services.
Outcomes will be shared with faculty, staff and students as appropriate.

Responsible parties:
• The Head Academic Adviser is responsible for conducting the survey and for reporting results to
the week 7 meeting members.
• The Homestay Coordinator is responsible for soliciting student evaluations from participating
students every term, making results available to the Director, and meeting with the Director to
discuss necessary modifications to the homestay program.
• The Tutor Coordinator is responsible for soliciting student evaluations from participating students
every term, making results available to the Director, and meeting with the Director to discuss
necessary modifications to the tutor program.
Timelines for review, revision and implementation:
• The review of all student services will take place annually during spring term.
• Necessary and desired revisions will be discussed at the next week 7 meeting, and responsible
parties will be identified.
• Recommendations will be considered at every week 7 meeting until decisions are made about the
necessity, desirability and/or feasibility of implementing recommendations are made.
Expected Outcome: Any revisions or modifications to current student services policies and /or
procedures will be communicated to faculty and staff (and to students, when appropriate) via email.
Scholarships

41



The AEI does give a few scholarships to IEP students each term. However, these are usually only awarded
through special arrangements with international agencies, such as Environmental Law (E-Law) or Mobility
International, or through university departments at the request of those departments. The Director may
offer additional scholarships to students who bring cultural diversity to the program. We request that
instructors and staff not encourage individuals to apply for AEI scholarships.

POLICIES & PROCEDURES FOR CLASSROOM OBSERVERS & RESEARCHERS
Observations of AEI classes
*All observations must be arranged through the Academic Advising Office.
The AEI recognizes the value of class observations to students taking applied linguistics classes and others
in the campus community. Faculty requesting observations for students should contact the Academic
Advising office. The AEI is generally unable to accommodate observation requests from individuals outside
the UO community.
Research using AEI students and/or facilities

*All proposals for research must be approved by the Director before any data collection or research
can take place.
Basic Principles




The AEI recognizes that language teaching & learning research is important for professional
development and program quality.
The basic mission of the AEI is teaching & therefore research should promote and not interfere with
teaching efforts.
All Office of Research and Services Administration (http://orsa.uoregon.edu/) and Human Subjects
(http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~humansub/index.html) guidelines will be followed.

Procedure for requesting use of AEI student or faculty data

Researchers may include: AEI faculty, Linguistics Dept. graduate students and faculty, other UO students, and
people from off-campus. All requests for research should be presented to the AEI Director, who may make a
decision or pass the request on to a Research Review Committee for further consideration. The Director will
decide on priorities when there are competing requests.
In general, research that involves data gathered solely for internal, on-campus use (e.g., classroom initiated
research or training grants) does not need to be reviewed by the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects
(CPHS) Social/Behavioral Panel Institutional Review Board (IRB).* If, however, the results of this research will
be disseminated in any way, then the research must receive approval from the CPHS/IRB. If no dissemination is
planned at the time the data are gathered, but the possibility of future dissemination exists, the faculty
member/student is advised to submit the project for approval when initiating the research.
Role of the AEI:



At AEI, we understand the importance of interviewing/observing instructors and collecting data from
students and teachers for your research. We will help “advertise” the opportunity to participate in the
research; however, we are not able to guarantee that potential research subjects will follow through. We

42



encourage you to work closely with your project adviser to develop a project with realistic expectations of
research subjects.



In order to ensure that we can continue providing researchers with instructor interview experiences, we limit
the number of interviews per teacher per term to one unless instructors notify us at the start of the term that
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


they will accept more than one interview. For this reason, we encourage you to initiate the process as early as
possible. Requests for interviews and/or classroom observations with specific instructors will be filled on a
first come, first served basis.

Procedure:
1) Meet with department faculty adviser, who will approve research project objectives and methodologies. This
person will provide a letter of support verifying that the research has met department approval.
2) Submit the information below to the AEI Director well in advance of the target date for beginning data
collection:
• Brief description of researcher’s background, interests, and motivation for study
• An abstract which includes the following information:
• Major objectives of research
• Methodologies to be employed
• Anticipated results
• Significance of study
• Date when study will begin & anticipated length of time
• Who the subjects will include (numbers, levels, nationalities…)
• Where and when research may be available to the public (either at a conference or in writing)
• A letter of support from the faculty advisor verifying that the research has met with department
approval (see #1)
• A letter verifying that the Office of Human Subjects has been contacted and an initial determination
has been made as to whether or not the researcher needs CPHS/IRB clearance. If a human
subjects report is needed, the researcher should first get approval from the AEI for the research
before completing all CPHS/IRB requirements. Once the requirements are met, provide the
Director with the necessary documentation.
3) Submit to the AEI Advising Office a copy of:
• Major objectives of research
• Methodologies to be employed
• Who the subjects will include (numbers, levels, nationalities…)
4) Meet with an Academic Adviser to discuss the data collection plans while CPHS/IRB approval is pending. The
adviser’s role is to coordinate research requests and serve as liaison between researchers and potential research
participants. Note that you are NOT permitted to contact instructors or students on your own; you MUST meet
with an adviser to discuss your research needs. Bring your survey/interview questions to the initial meeting with
the Academic Adviser. If you would like to observe a class, please tell the Adviser what kind of class you would
like to observe.
5) Wait for AEI Director’s final approval of the research proposal, after all ORSA and CPHS/IRB requirements
are met. Verification of having met these requirements must be submitted to the Director before research begins.
6) Meet again with the Academic Adviser to make arrangements for observations and data collection. If you have
been asked to modify your survey/interview questions, bring them to this meeting. If you are observing a class or
interviewing a teacher, the Academic Adviser contacts the teacher to ask for permission. Once the Adviser has

43



obtained permission, contact the teacher directly to set up a time to interview/observe. If you are doing an online
survey, the Adviser forwards the link to the targeted students via email.
7) Observe etiquette guidelines when you observe a class or interview a teacher/student. These include
arranging observations and interviews in advance, notifying in case of cancellation, and respecting time
limitations.
* Office for the Protection of Human Subjects General Statement:
The mission of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) is to protect the rights and welfare of people participating in
University of Oregon research. All human research activities must be prospectively reviewed and approved by a
diverse research ethics committee. All researchers at UO are required to uphold the principles of the Belmont
Report: 1) Respect for Persons, 2) Beneficence and 3) Justice as a condition of IRB approval.
http://humansubjects.uoregon.edu/

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY/STAFF
Substitution Policy
The AEI prefers to cover all classes rather than cancel them. Classes may be canceled or merged only by
permission of the Associate Director or the Director.

All substitutions, even if an instructor is paying for it personally, should go through the AEIS/IEP Services
Coordinator. If you are going to miss a class, for whatever reason, clear it through the Associate Director.

In the event that an instructor must miss class for personal reasons, it is the responsibility of that instructor
to find a substitute, pay that substitute, and notify the Associate Director of such an absence as far in
advance as possible. This is also the case when an instructor is absent for professional consulting. Current
rate for substitutes is $25/hour. Note that substitute instructors must already be AEI instructors (i.e.
somebody who is not already an AEI faculty member cannot substitute for an AEI instructor).

In case of illness, instructors are to contact the AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator, who is responsible for
getting substitutes for classes. Please try to call the night before if you think you are going to be ill the next
day. The earlier the notification, the more likely it is that a substitute can be found.
If an instructor has a paper/presentation at a conference, the AEI will provide a substitute if so approved
by the Director on the AEI Travel Request Form. Instructors should be prepared, however, for some quid
pro quo arrangements if there are many teachers going to the same conference.

Sick leave is a benefit for university instructors. For that reason, the AEI provides substitutes for
instructors who are ill. It also provides substitutes for instructors on jury duty. However, EVERYONE is
expected to help out with substitution if necessary. Generally, instructors appointed at less than 1.0 FTE are
asked to substitute and can be paid for the hours they do so; teachers appointed at 1.0 FTE may also be
asked to substitute.
Substitute hours are submitted at the end of each month. The AEIS/IEP Services Coordinator keeps track of
substitution and submits the list to the Director who reviews it and submits it to the Office Manager. If you
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


substitute, please keep track of your own hours, so the hours can be double-checked.

44



It is the responsibility of the instructor to see that the substitute gets the necessary material for teaching
the class. It is also highly recommended for instructors to have "generic" lessons that can be accessed for
substitution. It is required that all instructors have an emergency lesson plan on file in the Associate
Director’s office.
Inclement Weather
The University of Oregon cancels classes due to inclement weather very rarely. If you arrive to your
classroom and only a few students are present, instruction continues as planned.
Sick Leave and Vacation Time

The University of Oregon requires monthly sick leave reporting. In order to comply, the AEI has regularized
its sick leave and vacation policy.
Sick leave
Each faculty member is responsible for submitting a sick leave report to the Office/Budget Manager no
later than ten working days after the beginning of the next month. Forms to be used will be put in staff
boxes.

How time is recorded
Any weekday time during which the faculty member is unable to perform his or her instructional
duties or they are unable to work for the full weekday due to illness (this includes personal, family
illness or other applicable situation) is to be recorded as a full day of sick leave. If a faculty member
has two classes in a single day and is able to perform his or her instructional duties in one of the two
classes, only a half-day of sick leave shall be recorded.

If a faculty member has an appointment, the faculty member should do his or her best to schedule the
appointment so it does not conflict with his or her instructional time. In recognition of the nature of
instruction and the necessity to perform some of your duties outside of an 8 to 5 work schedule,
missing 1 to 2 hours for an appointment during non-instructional (classroom) time does not need to
be recorded as leave time.

Vacation leave/"personal" days
Vacation time is accrued by faculty members appointed at half-time or more on twelve-month officer
of administrator (OA) appointments. Vacation is not a benefit accorded to faculty members on less
than twelve-month appointments. "Personal days" are available to OPEU represented personnel only,
not to university faculty. Faculty members who require "personal days" are asked to request leave
without pay. [See UO Faculty Handbook for vacation and leave details.]
Support for Professional Development

The AEI encourages its faculty to actively pursue individual programs of professional development. It is AEI
policy to provide support for such efforts to the extent that it is financially feasible and equitably distributed.
This support may take the form of financial travel support to professional meetings, support for research,
travel support for regional and national positions held, allowing travel during the term for consulting
activity, providing substitutes for classes, etc.
All requests for professional development support must be approved by the Director. Travel request forms

45



are located in the AEI office; ask the Faculty Services Coordinator if you need one. The amount and extent of
support will be determined by the purpose for which it is requested, internal competition for support, and
available resources at any given time. For example, financial limitations dictated a case-by-case
determination of support during the 1999-2000 academic year. Any reduction in support will be taken into
consideration during the evaluation process.
If an instructor has a paper/presentation at a conference, the AEI will provide a substitute. Instructors
should be prepared, however, for some quid pro quo arrangements if there are many teachers going to the
same conference.
Overseas teaching/consulting guidelines

The AEI wishes to encourage its faculty to pursue short term teaching and consulting positions overseas.
The following policies applies in such situations:
• The AEI must follow UO guidelines for faculty leave. Such leave must minimize interference with
UO teaching. Student needs cannot be compromised.
• The Director will negotiate each situation individually with the faculty member, taking into
consideration the timing of the leave, amount of time, whether the individuals appointment is
administrative or teaching, whether the individual must be replaced during his/her absence, and
what the advantage to the AEI would be in terms of recruiting and professional development.
(Instructors are encouraged to use time between terms.)
• Salary adjustments and considerations would include the above plus the following:
• Cost to the AEI in both real dollars and in comparative terms (e.g., vis a vis a conference trip)
• Whether/how much the individual is being paid for the work
Private Tutoring and Consulting

It is not acceptable for an AEI instructor to accept remuneration for tutoring any student currently enrolled
in an AEI program (Intensive, AEIS, IGTF, or Special). Other tutoring is acceptable under the following
conditions:
• The amount of time devoted to such tutoring shall not exceed the 8 hours per week.
• Such tutoring must be permitted by UO policy.
• Such tutoring does not take place on AEI premises.
• The AEI name will not be used in any way in the carrying out of this tutoring (for such matters as
reserving space on campus, etc.).
• No AEI-supplied or copied consumable materials will be used for this tutoring.
• No AEI equipment or supplies are to be used to produce materials for this tutoring.
The AEI encourages its faculty to get involved in professional development outside the AEI, and this may
involve private consulting at various times. If such consulting is to be done during a regular AEI term, the
Director’s permission is required. In addition, instructors need to follow university Conflict of Interest
guidelines, which can be found on the UO website by searching for “Faculty conflict of interest guidelines.”
Instructors should expect to pay for their own subs during the time they are away. The Director must also
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


be consulted for permission to take leave for research, additional professional training, or other
professional development purposes. Permission for such leave must not be assumed, as it may depend on
the needs of the AEI at any given time.
Conflict of Interest

It is not acceptable for an AEI instructor to enter into any relationship with a current AEI student which
could potentially result in a conflict of interest. This includes but is not limited to being a host family, hiring

46



a student as baby-sitter or house-sitter, and dating a student.

Be wary of befriending former students who are continuing at AEI because they may show up in a higher
level class that you are teaching. Finally, instructors should not plan ANY religion-based activities with
their students. Distributing Bibles, visiting churches, lighting menorahs is offensive to some students. Even
if the activity is optional, students may feel that their grade is threatened if they do not participate.
Complaint Process

The AEI faculty complaint process follows the same procedure as the university. First, a letter is written to
a director, then to the Executive Committee, then to the Linguistics Department Head, and finally to the
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. All recent formal complaints are included in the files of the
Director.

FACULTY MATERIALS POLICY
Given the space and time constraints that the institute operates under, it is essential to create a balance
between efficient use of space and maintaining a respectful work environment.
Storage







Faculty should store files, books and other materials and resources in their currently assigned office. In
large, multi-person offices, the drawers of all file cabinets should be clearly marked with the name of
the instructor.
Adjunct faculty who are hired term-to-term need to store their materials off site during terms that they
are not employed, with the exception of those who are not teaching for just one term, e.g. they teach
during the academic year but not in summer.

Career faculty who will be gone on leave should make space available in their office so that another
faculty member can effectively utilize the space temporarily.

Retired faculty who are still teaching should arrange their office so that another faculty member can
effectively utilize the space in the terms when they do not have class. They should downsize to a core
set of resources and store less essential materials off site. Any file drawers or boxes should be clearly
labeled with name and contents.

Disposal of Hard Copy Materials

Before disposing of any books, paper files, storage boxes, or other materials, faculty or administrative staff
should make a good faith attempt, via multiple means of communication (e.g. email and phone) if
necessary, to contact the owner and receive permission to dispose of materials. (See above policy related
to storage of materials for faculty.)
Disposal of Electronic Files

47



It is standard policy that faculty members are responsible for backing up their own computer files. That
said, in the case of swapping out of computers or any steps leading to the removal of electronic files,
administrative staff and faculty should make a good faith attempt, via multiple means of communication
(e.g. email and phone) if necessary, to contact the owner, stating in advance the date and the steps to be
taken, and receive permission to dispose of materials. Before erasing a hard drive, technology staff should
confirm with the user that the transfer and/or storage of files has been successfully completed.
Borrowing

No one should borrow books or resources from another faculty member without prior permission. If it is
not possible to get permission from the person, short term borrowing should be accompanied by a note
telling who borrowed the materials and when.

TECHNOLOGY TIPS AND POLICIES
Do’s and Don’ts











DO restart your computer once a week or so. It keeps it happy. In fact, restarting (and physically
pushing on all your cables and cords to make sure they are all tightly secured, even if they *appear*
to be so) will take care of 90% of computer problems. Be proactive.
DO ask if you have a need for additional software (free or commercial) for work purposes.

DO KEEP YOUR OFFICE DOORS LOCKED at all times when unoccupied, even if you step out for just a
minute. This is the best prevention against theft and unauthorized use of computers.
DO NOT allow these updates/installs to run on your computer, please...
-- MS Office
-- .exe (these are PC applications and may be toxic, especially if received by email)

DO NOT install any new software on your computer without permission from the Director. Personal
software for balancing your checkbook, playing with your relatives photos, gaming, etc. is
absolutely not allowed on AEI desktop or laptop computers. If you install unauthorized software
and cause an AEI computer to go in for repairs, you may be liable for repair costs.
DO NOT install any passwords on your computers. Passwords make it very hard to come do
updates on them or trouble-shoot problems when you are not there.

NB: You can send messages to everyone in AEI at this email address: aeinews@lists.uoregon.edu.
Put documents you want to share on the AEI Network server or in hard copy in the photocopy
room.

File back-up, AEINetwork server
You are responsible for backing up your work-related files on the shared AEINetwork server on a regular
basis. We have no means for retrieving lost, damaged, or deleted files. Hard drives do occasionally fail.
Please assume that yours will do so some day when you least expect it. ALWAYS BACK UP YOUR FILES!

48



Minimize use of Lost & Found folder on AEInetwork.

Put only changed files back in the curriculum folders (do not duplicate entire folders and copy them back
in).
Please drag and drop professional-related work (research, conference papers, articles you want to save,
etc.) into your folder: AEInetwork > FACULTY BACK UP
AEI Tech Help Resources:

Distance Education Director
Handles all Distance Ed programs-related issues.
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


Instructional Technology Assistance

CASIT (College of Arts and Sciences Information Technology Support Services) provides computer support
and customer service to faculty, staff and GTFs. Their website can be found at: http://casit.uoregon.edu/
CASIT will provide basic on-call desktop support for the AEI faculty and staff during the hours of 8am-5pm
hours during Monday-Fridays. Requests should be submitted through the CASIT ticketing system. These
services include support for setting up new computers for faculty and staff, purchasing computers,
hardware troubleshooting (printing problems), software installation, software troubleshooting, email
troubleshooting, network connectivity issues, and regular inventory updates. CASIT expects the initial
response on ticketed events to be within four hours.
Server administrator for AEI, YLC, and Wired Humanities

Handles all things related to the AEI Network, all AEI databases and web sites, including the IEP student
grade database.
Faculty Services Coordinator

Handles reservations and/or check out of tech equipment (laptops, portable projectors, speakers, iPods,
digital cameras, etc.). For off-campus use, you fill out a form that the Director signs. You can get these forms
at the Faculty Services Coordinator’s desk in the Esslinger reception area.

Tech Apprentice from Information Services (IS)

We occasionally have a student worker "tech apprentice" (one person, part-time, for all of Pacific Hall) from
Information Services. Talk with the AEI Office Manager if you need this person’s assistance.
Campus Tech Help Resources:
YLC ROOM RESERVATIONS, FOR THE 113 LAB:
Contact the Assistant to the Associate Director for scheduling weekly classes in the lab. For occasional use
go to the YLC website at http://babel.uoregon.edu/
DUCKID (the UO account you use for email, Blackboard, wireless, etc.):
http://duckid.uoregon.edu
Or, take your UO ID to the Help Desk in the basement of McKenzie.

49



More information available from Information Services:
http://is.uoregon.edu/

SCIS Faculty Consulting at Knight Library (formerly the Center for Educational Technologies / CET)
http://libweb.uoregon.edu/scis/index.html
Scholarly Communications and Instructional Support (SCIS) provides help for members of the UO
community in both their research and their teaching. Services include educational technology training and
consulting for faculty members and GTFs, the BLACKBOARD course management system, and a variety of
services in support of faculty publishing. The department is also the focus for UO Libraries efforts tracking,
publicizing, and in some cases influencing broader trends in scholarly communications.
ELECTRONIC SHOP SERVICES
http://is.uoregon.edu/e_shop/
Also in the basement of McKenzie. Can help with repairs of personal computers (you pay, not AEI).

UO ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY expressly prohibits sharing of login/password information, use of your UO
email for political or commercial purposes, and P2P file sharing. For more information, please see:
http://is.uoregon.edu/cio/acceptable_use.shtml
SERVICE STATUS
To find out the status of services such as email, Blackboard, Banner, and DuckID, see:
http://status.uoregon.edu/

CLASSROOMS
You can check out any classroom on campus on this page: http;//libweb.uoregon.edu/tools/classrooms/
Before you are scheduled to teach, go into your rooms when they are empty and check to be sure that the
tech listed is actually working. If it isn’t, you can file a report with Media Services (541-346-3091).
Things to check:
• Be sure there is a remote control to turn on the projector with batteries that work (carrying a spare
pair with you is also useful)
• Be sure the bulb in the projector isn’t burned out (you may get a message on the screen when you
try to turn it on)
• Check to see if the DVD machine is working
• Check to see if the audio is working
• Make sure the screen goes down
It is also useful to practice the following so you don’t have to do it cold in front of your Ss the first time:
• How to hook up the computer to the audio
• Where to plug in the audio cord for an iPod
• Where the control button to change from using DVD to computer is
• Check the lights to see if it’s possible to turn off some of the lights and not others (useful for notetaking practice from the DVDs)
Try to anticipate what you will need to do so you can practice before. When all else fails, one of your
students will likely be able to help you.

50



APPENDIX 1
AEI FACULTY REVIEW POLICY
This policy was updated Winter 2009 in accordance with the 2008 Non Tenure Track Faculty (NTTF)
document.
PURPOSE OF REVIEW

As an academic unit in a large research university, the American English Institute has developed a
mission statement that includes both academic and service-oriented program goals. This faculty
review has been instituted to enable the unit to achieve three parts of its mission statement:
AEI will be recognized by:
1. all of its stakeholders as a high quality program respected for faculty expertise, dedication to
students, and effective program development.
2. the profession as a key contributor to the field of ESL in language learning and teaching research,
teacher training, and program development.
3. the University as a valued partner in its academic mission.

The review will be used:
1. to promote individual and program improvement in the direction of meeting unit goals.
2. to recognize individual contributions to the program.
3. to meet university regulations regarding faculty reviews.
4. to provide input for promotion and rehiring decisions, as well as merit and/or equity salary
increases for career NTTF.
a. Promotion and rehiring: The review process functions to provide annual information to the
review committee and Directors about how these faculty are contributing to the goals of the AEI.
The annual review allows for timely constructive feedback to C1 and C2 faculty during their first six
years at the AEI prior to their promotion to Senior Instructor I (C3) status.
b. Merit salary increases: To adhere to university requirements, the AEI must group career NTTF
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


faculty into three groups each year for purposes of merit pay distribution in years when merit pay
increases are available. The grouping identifies which faculty, in that year, fall into the highest,
middle and lowest groups. It is important to note that faculty who fall into the lowest group in any
given year are not necessarily failing to meet the high expectations of the AEI. Input from the
annual review committee about these groupings is given to the Director, who then determines the
distribution of merit pay. The Linguistics Department head gives final approval for merit increases.

PROGRAM EXPECTATIONS OF FACULTY

There are two areas of consideration in this review: (1) Teaching/Administration and (2) Professional
Development and Service. Teaching and administration are the prime activities of a language institute, so
strength in this area is extremely important. Both professional development and service are highly valued,
but it is understood that individual faculty members may focus on different areas over the course of a
review cycle or from year to year depending upon their own areas of interest or the interests and needs of
the AEI.

AEI faculty appointments are identified as adjunct or career track. Program expectations and goals
vary with the type of appointment.
Adjunct faculty are expected to focus primarily on the program quality aspect of the mission stated
above. This includes teaching classes, helping with program operation and development, and working on
materials and curriculum. Although the focus of adjunct faculty efforts is on program quality, it is expected

51



that they will support the other aspects of the mission, providing service where needed and manifesting a
professional interest in the field.

Career faculty, although expected to contribute to program quality in the same areas as the adjunct
faculty, are the main contributors towards the other two aspects of the mission statement, that is, seeing
that the AEI is a key contributor to the ESL field and supporting the academic and research mission of the
university. Therefore, there is a high expectation that career faculty will fill administrative positions as
needed, be professionally active, and contribute service to the American English Institute, the University of
Oregon, and the professional community.

AEI Standards
All faculty are expected to “meet the high standards of the AEI,” in accordance with their status as
adjunct or career faculty. There is no one prescription for what constitutes “meeting the high
standards of the AEI.” The wide variety of efforts in the areas of teaching and administration
represented by the faculty along with the varying significant contributions that individual faculty
members make to the overall well-being of the AEI will be taken into account by a peer review
committee and the Director. However, in general, all faculty are expected to demonstrate flexibility
and versatility in teaching assignments and scheduling, as dictated by program needs; in addition,
career faculty are expected to engage in activities that make a significant contribution to the field.
(See Appendix 2, “Criteria for Promotion,” for more information.)
In 2008-09 the review committee created a rubric for professional development and service. In
2009-10, the review committee created a rubric for teaching. These rubrics help the review
committed distinguish faculty that meet the AEI’s high standards and those that exceed the AEI’s
high standards.

Performance expectations will not change unless there is specific notification to faculty at the beginning
of the review cycle. In addition, individual expectations and goals are determined by each faculty
member in conversation with the director at an annual review meeting so that each member of the
faculty can know at the end of each review cycle what is expected of him or her.





These charts are meant to provide guidance only and are not meant to be an exhaustive list of
recognized service and research/ professional development. Each instructor’s personal narrative is
also important.
“Exceeds high standards” is used in determining merit pay increases.
The details of activities are still held to be important (e.g. for purposes of determining merit,
presenting at a national conference may be considered more prestigious than presenting at a local
conference, or a short review or teaching tip-type publication may be considered less prestigious
than a journal publication).

52



Evaluation Considerations for Teaching

53



Sample guidelines for meeting and exceeding the AEI’s high standards of professional development
and service

54



DEVELOPMENT OF REVIEW POLICY
The AEI review process was originally designed in 1991 by a faculty committee and has been modified over
time as a result of such factors as new university policies regarding faculty review, changes in AEI goals and
directions, improvement in procedures, and a desire for greater efficiency in the overall process. The
review process will most likely continue to change over time for these very reasons.
Review policy is established the entire faculty and with feedback from the review committee each year. The
review committee does not set policy. The director has final discretion over policy, but any changes in
policy should be reviewed by the faculty.
Because review policy may continue to change, it is important that such changes be communicated clearly
and in writing to the faculty as a whole. Any change in the policy or process requires that the review policy
be rewritten with a clear explanation of exactly what the changes are. This should happen at the beginning
of the review cycle (fall term), so that faculty members have adequate time to make decisions about how to
spend their professional time over the review cycle. If faculty have any questions about the review process
or policy, they should talk with the review committee, or the directors.

The review policy should be explained in detail to all newly hired faculty members by the Director at the
faculty orientation meeting. In particular, new faculty should clearly understand the components of the
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


Annual Report, the Yearly Review Form, the Classroom Observation Form, and how ratings are determined.
REVIEW DESCRIPTIONS AND PROC EDURES
Areas of Review Faculty are reviewed in the areas of teaching/administrative responsibilities and
professional development/service. These categories are consistent with university requirements for reviewing
all faculty members. In light of that fact that within our unit a majority of the instructor time is spent on
teaching or administration, course development, and teaching related duties, teaching/administration is
weighted as 67% of the review. Professional development/service is weighted at 33% of the review.
The review is done by a peer review committee composed of C2 and C3 instructors. The Director will use the
results of the review process as outlined below.
Who Gets Reviewed NTTF adjunct instructors will be required neither to submit an
annual review form nor to be evaluated by the review committee. They will be requi red
to submit a narrative of acti vities and goals once a year, as well as an updated CV, to be
used the Director i n the annual formative consultation.

NTTF Adjunct faculty All NTTF adjunct faculty will have one or more summative observations by the
Director or an appointed alternate during their first year and at the Director’s discretion during subsequent
years. It is university policy for all instructors to participate in an informative classroom observation every
year.
NTTF career track i nstructors will be required to submit an annual review report and to
be evaluated by the committee on a yearly basis.

The director will meet with each NTTF career track faculty member at the conclusion of the review process,
writing a brief paragraph outlining the goals of the faculty member for the coming academic year.

55



GTFs do not participate in this particular review system but instead are expected to work closely with
faculty who are responsible for their teaching experience at the AEI.
Retired faculty do not participate in the review process.

Components of the Review o f NTTF Career Track Faculty
Instruct or Portfolio NTTF career track faculty must submit the following items to the peer review
committee by early May of each review year. Each faculty member is responsible for making sure that the
annual statement is complete, and that it includes sufficient detail to let the peer review committee and the
director know the nature and extent of work involved in all areas of review (teaching, professional
development and service). Instructors are strongly encouraged to keep their own back-up copies of all
relevant portfolio documents.
[Note: There are sample forms for faculty use of each of the following documents, listed by document title,
under Annual Review Materials on the file server.]
1. Updated vit a Each year the vita should be updated by the faculty member to include relevant
new information. This information is not used for the review, but the University requires that an
updated vita be part of each faculty members personnel file.

2. Annual St atement of Teaching/Administ ration and Professional
Development/Service This report, written by each faculty member, supplies specific
information in the areas of Teaching/Administration and Professional Development/Service. This is
necessarily of more detail than the vita. A sample form, with recommended areas for inclusion, is
provided as a model to follow so that faculty can uniformly supply a sufficient and appropriate level
of detail. The annual statement includes self-evaluation and a description of goals.
3. Student class evaluation forms These are computerized printouts of student responses to
the standard AEI student review forms passed out in all classes each term. There should be forms
for the entire academic year.
4. Student comment pages According to university policy, any signed student comment sheets
must be included in faculty files. Comment sheets that are not signed may not be included. Each
term, front office personnel provide these for faculty to make sure that copies are included in
personnel files.

5. Description of the formative observation The observation is done yearly. Each faculty
member is required to participate in a formative observation (observing or being observed by a
peer) each year. The formative observation may have a faculty-defined focus or may be an
observation of choice. A brief report should be submitted with the annual report describing the
purpose of the formative observation, what was done, what was learned, who was involved, and the
dates. See Handbook section under Staff Policies and Procedures for Faculty for additional
information on formative observations.

6. Letters or documentation of professional work Any letters or documentation of
professional work that the faculty member feels would provide additional relevant information,
including but not limited to letters of commendation for service on a national committee, press
clippings, or any other information the committee may not be aware of from the information above
may be included in the review file. This includes anything that the faculty member feels gives the
review committee and the director additional, important information about his or her work.

56



In addition, the peer review committee will collect and add to the portfolio the following:

7. Summative classroom observation s The AEI has standard observation forms that are
filled out by an observer from the Review Committee. These forms must be signed by both the
observer and the faculty member observed. C1 faculty have two summative observations during the
first year of employment, and no summative observations during year 2 or 3. C2 faculty have one
summative observation during years 4, 5 and 6 of employment. C1, C2 and C3 instructors may
request additional summative observations if they have concerns about peer observations and/or
student evaluations.

8. Faculty Review by Administrat ors F orms All faculty with administrative FTE submit
completed forms with comments about faculty performance in situations where work either
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


exceeds or falls below general high expectations. In addition to being included in the portfolio,
copies of these forms will be given to the relevant faculty member and put in personnel files.

9. Administrative Review by Faculty All faculty are invited to fill out review forms for each
individual with administrative FTE. Administrators will receive copies of these completed forms
and, if the form is signed, a copy also goes into the administrator’s personnel file. Unsigned forms
are given to the person being reviewed. Review Committee and Director see only the signed forms,
which are in the faculty members file.

The peer review committee will use the Annual Statement of teaching/ administration and professional
development/service, student class evaluation forms, signed student comment pages, summative
classroom evaluations (if applicable), the Faculty Review by Administrators form (if applicable), and the
Administrative Review by Faculty forms (if applicable) in the teaching/administrative review process. All
of these items must be in faculty files by the middle of May so that the peer review committee can review
the documents, evaluate the instructors’ contributions and forward a report to the Director.

Personnel responsible for Review

Individual faculty members are responsible for ensuring that their files are complete and all
materials have been submitted to the review committee by the deadline. Faculty are also invited to
provide input for the review of administrators.

The peer review committee consists of four or six faculty members. The review committee
implements policy established by the Director after discussion with the entire faculty. It does not
create policy.

The Director and faculty administrators provide input into the review process by reviewing
faculty performance in areas relevant to their particular programs. (For example, the Director will
comment on faculty who have made particularly strong contributions or need to be encouraged to
participate in particular ways.)

The Director is responsible for meeting with individual faculty members on an annual basis to
discuss the review. The director maintains final discretionary authority over the review process
and makes final decisions regarding rehiring, merit increases, and disputes arising from the review
process.

57



Peer Review Committee
Committee membership: All C2 and C3 faculty are listed on a ballot unless individual circumstances
prohibit their participation in a given year. This is perceived as valuable for both the faculty member and
the AEI as a whole. Committee membership provides faculty with a good overview of the wide range of
teaching and administrative activities of faculty within the AEI, ensures that as a peer group the committee
will be fair and be perceived as fair, and encourages a continuous upgrading of the entire review process.
The number of committee members: The committee consists of four or six members depending
upon the workload. Members are elected by the entire faculty from the ballot of eligible C2 and C3 faculty.

Workload: Review committee work is very time intensive. However, there is no release time from normal
teaching, testing, and other faculty responsibilities, so faculty serving on the committee are encouraged to
minimize other committee commitments. Participation on the review committee should be reported on the
Annual Statement of Professional Development/Service.
REVIEW PROC ESS

1. The peer review committee collects all relevant information from the faculty portfolio relating to
teaching/ administration and professional development/service.
2. The committee then meets, reviews the information from each portfolio, and transfers pertinent
information onto the final review form. The committee uses the following guidelines to determine
whether a faculty member’s performance meets or exceeds the standard in each area.
3. The committee gives written comments about strengths and areas for improvement, if applicable,
in both of the key areas on the form. The review is given to the faculty member for response and a
required signature. There are two options for signing:
• “I have read and accept the Review Report.”
• “I have read and do not accept the Review Report”, which would be accompanied by reasons for
the disagreement.
4. The committee then determines whether the faculty member’s performance meets or does not
meet expectations in the two major areas under review (teaching/administration & professional
development/service).
5. The committee highlights significant contributions supporting information about the ratings. It is
also noted when faculty performance exceeds or highly exceeds expectations.

6. The review is given to the faculty member for a response and a required signature. There are two
options for signing:
*“I have read and accept the review report”.
*“I have read and do not accept the review report”, which should be accompanied by reasons for
the disagreement.

7. Once the review is signed it is given to the director. The original signed review form, whether
accepted or not accepted, must be returned to the committee by the time designated by the
committee.

8. The director reviews the file and reads the material submitted by the review committee. The
director then schedules a meeting with each faculty member to discuss the review, and to set goals
and directions for the coming year. After the meeting, the director writes a summary of the
discussion and gives it to the faculty member for response and signature. The same signature

58



options apply. Once signed, the Director’s summary is placed in the professional file along with the
committee’s report.

9. The review committee submits to the Director a tiered ranking of career instructors based on
performance reviews for the year for the purpose of awarding merit raises should they become
available.

Timeline The original, signed review form, whether accepted or not accepted, must be returned to the
committee by the time designated by the committee. The entire review procedure, including any grievance
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


procedures, is to be completed by the end of summer term.

Grievance Procedure If a faculty member has questions or comments about the content of the review
report, he/she should notify the review committee head within a time designated by the committee.
If relevant information has been omitted from the instructor’s portfolio that could have affected the score,
this should be brought to the attention of the committee. Instructors are responsible for reporting all
relevant information on their original annual statements. However, if they have overlooked something the
omission can be corrected at this time. The committee will decide whether this additional information can
be included after the fact and if it will change the final rating.

If a faculty member feels that the review report does not represent his/her real performance over the last
year, he/she can do one of two things:
1. sign the line which specifies "I have read it and do not accept", document the concerns in writing at
the bottom of the Review Report, and return it for inclusion in his personnel file, or
2. sign the line which specifies "I have read it and do not accept", document the concerns in writing at
the bottom of the review report, and put a request for reconsideration in writing to the review
committee chair along with a copy of the report.
Upon receiving a documented concern, the committee chair will talk with the rest of the review committee
to see if reconsideration seems warranted. If a change seems warranted, the committee may make the
change, making sure that such a change does not require re-review of all other faculty. The changed form
will then go back to the instructor and a copy put into the instructors file.
If the committee feels the review has been fairly given and should not be changed, the faculty member will
be notified in writing and a copy of the Review Report will be submitted to the personnel file.

If the faculty member is still not satisfied with the report, s/he can express dissatisfaction in writing
and submit this memo with all of the other documents to the director.
The director will then discuss the matter with the review committee chair and make the final
decision.
Finally, the review committee report, and whatever additional memos the instructor, review
committee, or director would like to see included, are filed in the instructors personnel file.
The Direct or’ s Summary The director’s summary is written by the director. Input for the report
includes:

1. Annual review feedback form submitted to the director by the peer review committee
2. Results of the end-of-review meeting between the director and the faculty member, which
will include expected directions and areas for continued focus.

59



Grievance procedure If the recipient is not satisfied with the Director’s summary, the following
procedure may be followed:
1. The faculty member follows the signature options described above and gives a written request to
the director, specifying the area(s) of dispute and requesting reconsideration. This may include
another meeting with the director.
2. The director reads though the file again and decides whether to change the report or let it stand.
3. The faculty member must then sign, stating objections.
4. If the faculty member is still not satisfied, he/she may pursue the matter through the university
grievance procedure outlined in the electronic UO Faculty Manual.
CLASSROOM OBSERV ATIONS

Who Gets Observed






NTTF Career faculty
C1 faculty have two summative observations during the first year of employment (one by the Review
Committee and one by the Director).
C2 faculty have one summative observation by the Review Committee in years 4, 5, & 6 of employment.
C1, C2, and C3 instructors may request additional summative observations if they have concerns about
peer observations and/or student evaluations.
The director’s discretion In certain circumstances, the Director may require that a faculty
member be observed regardless of length of time at the AEI.

The Observation Process for NTTF Career Track Faculty

Who Does the Observations: NTTF Career Track Faculty are observed by a member on the
review committee. Faculty will be permitted to request an alternate observer if they are not comfortable
with an assigned observer.

Timing of Observations: Faculty will be asked which class they would like to have observed and will
be given timely notification. In general, the class to be observed should be a core class, not an elective. The
director may request that particular classes be observed. Most observations will take place during winter
and spring terms.
Observation procedure: The observation procedure will consist of three steps:

1. Pre-observation meeting The observer will meet with the faculty member to discuss the goals
and context of the lesson and review the classroom observation instrument.
2. Observation Observer will sit in on the class.
3. Post-observation meeting There will be two post meetings:
a) The first meeting will be a brief communication immediately after class. This is an opportunity
to give the evaluator any additional information that may be relevant, to give the teacher a
chance to explain how he/she felt about how the class went, and to provide any further
explanations of student behavior or activities.
b) The second meeting will be a longer meeting to go over the observation. The observer and
teacher will go over the filled out observation report and the observer will explain the reasons
for the scores. At this point, the teacher may provide additional comments or clarification and

60



the observer may amend comments if appropriate. The observation form should be signed by
the faculty member within a time designated by the committee and returned to the observer for
inclusion in his/her file.

Review Committee Observation Form: This form consists of 26 items relating to
preparation/organization, classroom procedure, interaction/social climate and teaching qualities which
the observer will comment on the various aspects of teaching as identified on the observation form. An
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


item may also be marked “non-applicable” (NA).

Grievance Procedure: If a faculty member does not agree with the observation, (i.e. he/she thinks that a
comment is unwarranted) he/she can make a direct request to the observer at the time of the postobservation meeting. If the observer feels the comment is justified, the faculty member can do either of two
things:
1. Sign the back of the form along with a statement explaining the nature of the disagreement. This
statement will then go into the file.
2. Request an additional observation. A copy of the observation and a letter requesting an additional
observation should be sent to the review committee chair. The review committee will then decide
whether or not a second observation is warranted. If a second observation is done, it will be stapled
to the top of the previous review with a memo that it should supersede the earlier observation. If it
is decided that a second observation is not warranted, the instructor must sign the observation
indicating that it has been read and may attach a description of the area of disagreement.

Meeting with the Director: The reasons for the faculty member to meet with the director are to 1)
review his/her achievements; 2) consider and discuss each faculty member’s goals, interests and directions
and how those relate to program needs and directions; 3) provide continuity by linking past goals with
future goals; 4) give an opportunity for the faculty member to address any concerns with the review
process.
Review and Merit, Promotion, and Rehiring: This review process is only one factor in
determining decisions about merit, promotion, and rehiring. The AEI must abide by university guidelines
and get final approval by the College of Arts and Sciences and Linguistics Department for many of these
decisions.

Salary increases: There are several types of salary increases within the College of Arts and Sciences.

COLA Cost of living increases are across-the-board raises that are distributed equally across the
faculty.
Merit For merit raises, CAS usually distributes a formula for the unit to follow. These cannot be
across the board raises, but must be based on internal procedures developed for determining
faculty performance.
Retention This type of raise can be given in order to retain faculty who are particularly valuable to
the unit.
Equity This raise is used to enable the unit to equalize salaries. For example, new hires may be
offered higher salaries than established faculty. Equity raises are used to re-establish parity.

Application process for career-t rack faculty positions: (See general description of
instructional positions) For adjunct to career promotion, Affirmative Action guidelines and Linguistic
Department directives require a national search, which entails the appointment of a search committee, a
prescribed selection process, and a report as to who was or was not hired and why. The director forwards
the search committee recommendations to the Linguistics Department and College of Arts and Sciences for
final approval. It is the AEI policy, supported by the Linguistics Department, that we maintain a reasonable
adjunct to career ratio because of the unpredictability of the international market.

61



Promotion from C2 t o C 3 senior positions Promotion from C2 to C3senior instructor involves a
university mandated review process with final approval by the Linguistics Department and the College of
Arts and Sciences. It is to occur during the sixth year of service for an instructor appointed on a nine-month
contract that is on a career instructor track (this is described in detail in career instructor promotion
documents).
Rehiring Rehiring of faculty from contract to contract depends first on the numbers of expected students
for subsequent terms. Senior career track faculty is rehired first, then C2 and C1, and then adjunct and
finally retired faculty. Criteria for rehiring include seniority and the needs of the institute, with program
need taking precedence.

Seniority is defined as the amount of time working at the AEI (as opposed to cumulative experience in
other places) taking into account both number of terms at the AEI and total FTE. The factors listed below
will be considered in determining seniority:
1. Terms at the AEI. Total number of terms at the AEI will be counted, noting full time FTE and part
time FTE.
2. Summer terms. Summer terms will be credited since AEI summer terms are like any other term and
have additional demands for faculty to work in special programs.
3. Off –site work arranged through the AEI. For example, work in Ukraine or with the School of
Education/Business as part of a grant or other agreed upon arrangements.
4. Faculty exchanges. For example, when a faculty member works at another institution and their
faculty member comes here.
5. Fulbright or other language-oriented projects of that ilk. Any Fulbright or other projects related to
language work (for example, Peace Corps) that is approved beforehand by the AEI director will be
considered.

The following factors will NOT be considered in determining seniority:
1. Leave of absence – When faculty take leaves of absence for family or health reasons, this time will not
be counted as work time.
2. GTF time – the time spent as a GTF at the AEI will not be counted towards total time here. Such
appointments are made by the Linguistics Dept. and do not go through AEI usual hiring and
evaluation process.
Program need is defined by the technical expertise and specialized qualifications required for a specific
function (ex: IT expertise for the technology coordinator position, counseling background for adviser role, PhD
for teaching in the Linguistics department). The director will have the responsibility to identify/define
program need and specialized qualifications necessary to meet that need. Faculty credentials will be a
component in rehiring decisions only as they relate to program need. Few administrative assignments meet
program need criteria because core faculty can fill most administrative functions.
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


Review forms and record keeping: The review committee will use the following forms. All forms
are available on the file server.
1. Annual Review (template used by faculty to fill in their years activities)
2. Final Review Form (form that is returned to faculty)
3. Yearly Review Form Worksheet (for use by the committee in compiling data)
4. Classroom Observation Form (form that is given to the teacher)
5. Classroom Observation Log (form may be used by observer to collect data)
6. Faculty Review of Administrators Form (form used by faculty to evaluate each administrator)–
7. Administrator Review of Faculty Form (form used by Administrators to evaluate those faculty
members who are performing above or below a 2 level

62



All updated forms will be kept on the file server, dated, and labeled to correspond with the above
documents.
All records of who was on the review committee, date of faculty member observations, and who observed
whom will be kept by the director and made available to each review committee.

63



APPENDIX 2
Criteria for assignment of 1- and 2-year contracts
Overview: The American English Institute places a high value on quality performance from its faculty. It
demonstrates this commitment in recognizing two areas of contribution: teaching/administration and
professional development/service.

AEI hires faculty at the rank of instructor, non-tenure track (under General Description of Instructor
Positions in the Instructors and Responsibilities section). Three types of instructor positions are currently
in place at AEI:
1. Adjunct faculty are hired regionally and are generally offered 3-month temporary contracts.
However, 9-month contracts may be offered for administrative purposes. Adjunct faculty are not
eligible for promotion, merit salary increases, or COLA. New adjunct faculty are considered to be on
a probationary period for the first six months of their employment.
2. Career instructors are hired in a national search and are given 9-month renewable contracts.
Career instructors are promoted to Senior Instructor after 18 terms of satisfactory performance in
the areas of contribution listed above. Senior (C3) instructors are given two-year contracts. This
report describes criteria for evaluation of career faculty members as well as criteria for promotion
to senior instructor positions at the American English Institute.
Criteria for satisfactory performance: Because of its status as a member of an academic
community of the caliber of the University of Oregon as well as its status as a primarily self-supporting
entity, offering excellence in all programs is essential to the on-going success of the AEI. As a result,
excellence in teaching, support of program administration and development and involvement in
professional development and service are crucial responsibilities of all AEI faculty members.

For career faculty, significant participation in professional development and service is essential, together
with excellence in teaching. In addition to the above, senior instructors are expected to provide the
versatility and leadership that are required for effective operation of a language program. This versatility is
especially crucial in times of declining enrollment when the AEI may need to look primarily to senior
instructors for all aspects of the program. Below are details of the expectations of each AEI faculty member
together with an explanation of components of the annual review and procedures for promotion.
DEPARTMENTAL REVIEW

Purpose of the Review: As an academic unit in a large research university, the American English
Institute has developed a mission statement that includes both academic and service oriented program
goals. The faculty review has been instituted to enable the unit to achieve three parts of its mission
statement. AEI will be recognized by:
• its stakeholders as a high quality program respected for faculty expertise, dedication to students,
and effective program development;
• the profession as a key contributor to the field of ESL in language learning and teaching research,
teacher training, and program development; and
• the university as a valued partner in its academic mission.
The purpose of the review is to promote individual and program improvement in the direction of meeting
unit goals, to recognize individual contributions to the program, to meet university regulations regarding
faculty reviews, and to provide input for salary, promotion, and rehiring decisions.

Review Policy: All full-time AEI faculty are reviewed by a peer review committee and the director,
using a review procedure developed by the faculty as a whole. The review procedure is based on, but not
limited to, available university guidelines. The value AEI places on teaching/administration and
professional development/service service are reflected in the AEI Faculty Review Policy (See Appendix 1)

64



and Procedures. The AEI requires faculty to be balanced in the two areas emphasized in the annual review
over a period of time. All career faculty are reviewed annually prior to contract renewal. The review is done
by a peer review committee. The director uses the review information for an annual meeting with each
faculty member followed by a final written summary.

Teaching/Administration As teaching and administration are prime activities of a language
institute, strength in this area is critical. Contributions in this area include classroom teaching, curriculum
design and development, coordination with other instructors, flexibility across curriculum and programs,
and testing and orientation responsibilities. AEI recognizes faculty contributions from a wide spectrum. To
that end, faculty submit a portfolio for review each year which includes the following documentation for
evaluation of teaching and administration: self-assessment, summative classroom observation by peer
faculty in required years, report on formative observation, student evaluations and comments, faculty
review of administrators, and administrator review of faculty.
Annual statement of teaching/administration is part of a self-assessment report, written by each faculty
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


member, which supplies specific information in the areas of teaching and administration. This statement
provides more detail than a vita and can be used to show relationships between professional
development/service and teaching/administration, as well as to emphasize areas of teaching that
demonstrate particular contributions to the area of teaching and administration for the year in review.

Summative classroom observations document the quality of teaching of each faculty member for the annual
review as well as support promotion to senior instructor. Summative classroom observations are
conducted for all career faculty during their first year of employment as well as in years four, five, and six.
Other faculty members may request summative evaluations annually as a supplement to student
evaluations.

Formative classroom observation is required of every faculty member during each academic year. Regular
self-assessment of teaching strengths and weaknesses is highly valued in the American English Institute.
The formative observation provides an opportunity for faculty to select a particular aspect of their teaching
on which they would like to concentrate and to seek peer input to assist in developing that area.

Student evaluation and comment is collected from the standard, computer-scored, student evaluation forms
and from signed student comments on additional evaluation instruments.

Faculty review of administrators and administrator review of faculty performance are collected via
evaluation instruments using numeric as well as prose feedback to assess the contribution of both faculty
by administrators and administrators by faculty.

Profession al Development/Service: The role of professional development in AEI is to enhance
operational efficiency, instructional quality, and the national and international reputation of the program.
This area may include research, conference presentations, publications, curriculum development, internal
program administration responsibilities, program evaluation, and service to regional and national
professional organizations. The role of service in a language institute is to provide support for the
administration of day-to-day, ongoing operations of the institute and its programs, and to provide service to the
university and the broader community. Because service is essential to the on-going operation of the institute and
the university, it is considered an important component in the annual review.

65



Process: A peer review committee collects, reviews, and summarizes all information from the faculty
portfolio relating to teaching and administration. The committee submits feedback forms to faculty and
forwards signed forms to the director.

The director meets with faculty members to discuss the peer committee review to set goals and directions
for the coming year. The director summarizes contributions and future plans and submits the summary to
faculty for signature.
PROMOTION OR CHANGE OF CONTRACT TYPE

PChange from adjunct to career inst ruct or Adjunct faculty have the opportunity to apply for
core positions only through a national search. Internal candidates compete for positions together with
external applicants. Finalists for career positions are selected by a search committee and forwarded to the
Linguistics Department and College of Arts and Sciences for final approval.

Promotion from career (C2) to senior (C 3) inst ructor Promotion from career C2 to senior
instructor C3 involves a university-mandated review process with final approval by the Linguistics
Department and the College of Arts and Sciences. It is to occur during the sixth year of full-time service for a
career C2 instructor appointed on a nine-month contract.
Procedures for promotion to senior instructor

Third Year Review In the third year of a career C1 faculty member’s contract, the director will review and
evaluate performance using the categories of the annual review. The review is expected to be candid and
should include specific suggestions for improvement as needed. This review will be signed by the director
and the instructor. The director notifies the Office Manager to reclassify the instructor to C2.

Criteria for Promotion from C2 to Senior C3 Instructor Quality teaching is the most important criteria
and is based on teaching-related duties, administrative duties, materials development and service within
the university. Professional activity beyond the normal duties of teaching and service within the university
are required. Examples of such professional activity include: writing a resource book or an article accepted
in an edited book, articles and reviews written for and accepted in journals (particularly refereed journals),
editing journals and books, writing language textbooks, presentations at conferences, service to
professional organizations, professional consultations, and awards and grants.

Data Sources for Review In their sixth year of service to AEI, career faculty who are being brought
forward for promotion to C3 senior instructor will submit a portfolio including the following: candidate
statement and vita, annual review reports of the candidate by the AEI evaluation committee (annual review
reports include: instructor’s annual review statements summarizing each year’s work, classroom
observation reports, summary of student classroom evaluations plus any signed student evaluations,
coordinator reports, faculty and staff evaluations of administrator and/or coordinator positions), and an
independent review or evaluation of professional work by peers and/or experts in the field when possible.
Process An ad hoc C3 senior instructor review committee consisting of C3 senior instructors will be
appointed by the AEI director in the fall of the sixth year of appointment as a core instructor. The
committee will evaluate all relevant material pertaining to the candidate’s qualifications and report their
recommendation to the AEI director. The AEI director will write a report and include it in the portfolio
forwarded to the Linguistics faculty, which will vote on whether to advance the candidate to the rank of C3
Figyelem! Ez itt a doksi tartalma kivonata.
Kérlek kattints ide, ha a dokumentum olvasóban szeretnéd megnézni!


senior instructor. The entire portfolio, including the Linguistics Department vote, the ad hoc committee
recommendation, and supporting materials is then forwarded to the Dean of College and Arts and Sciences
for a final decision before forwarding to Academic Affairs.

66